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"Shop Talk" (House Rules and game changes)

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
#1
Heya folks! I am going to go through the nearly-100 post thread of our game together (wow! 8D ) and put all of the new things we have added (spells, feats, House Rules, etc.) here.
 
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Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
#2
SHOP TALK - House Rules & Game Changes

House Rule: Temporal Stasis (also known as "T.S.") - All players please read this.
Note to players: If Real Life grabs you and you have to leave our game for an unusual length of time, do go (with my prayers), but please post in Adventurers' Table so the rest of us know. I don't need details; I do need notice.
We have no way of knowing what is going on with you if you do not tell us. Failure to comply with this risks your removal from the game. I am not kidding.

Temporal Stasis works like this. When a player is unable to attend our game due to Real Life, that person's character, along with any other creatures with that character (pet, etc.), and all items personally belonging to that character are taken out of play. This is called placing the character in Temporal Stasis. The character is therefore unable to be harmed, helped, or otherwise interacted with.
When the player is able to return, the character also returns in the same condition they were in prior to the departure. I will adjust the challenge of the game accordingly. For purposes of this online game, characters will not cease to gain experience points.
Reasoning: It's another one from the "lessons learned" category, really. If one of our players has some serious Real Life event that lasts, it's really not fair that their character suffer. Bad enough we don't have the privilege of the player's company, worse still to screw their character along with them due to circumstances the player cannot control...

House Rule: Action Points.
Important Dungeon Master notes: We are only using Action Points for their "Add to A Roll" benefit (see website link if you want further details - I have copy/pasted our relevant information below). I have edited out the information below to only include the die-raising features. As usual, if you have any questions, let me know.

From:D20srd.com

Action points also make it more likely that the use of a character’s most potent abilities will be successful. For example, although its overall effect on an encounter might be minimal, few things frustrate a paladin more than missing with a smite attack—an event that becomes less likely when using action points.

That said, action points can also lead characters to routinely get in over their heads (relying on action points to save themselves), and for GMs to unconsciously increase the difficulty of encounters (since characters are more likely to succeed against foes of equal power). This is as fine as long as the characters have a reserve of such points to spend—but if they run out, encounters that would otherwise be merely challenging can become incredibly deadly. Keep the number of action points available to your characters in mind when designing encounters.

For GMs who are worried that action points increase the power level of characters without an offsetting cost, there’s an easy solution. Just think of each action point as a one-use magic item with a broad range of possible effects. With that analogy, it becomes easy to justify reducing the amount of treasure awarded to balance out the accrual of action points. Note that this is merely a tool for GMs interested in carefully monitoring character power levels; action points should never be for sale.

An action point is roughly equivalent to a magic item worth 100 gp per character level (since the higher a character’s level, the more potent the effect).

Acquiring Action Points
A beginning (1st-level) character starts the game with 5 action points. A character above 1st level starts the game with a number of action points equal to 5 + 1/2 his current character level.

Every time a character advances, he gains a number of action points equal to 5 + 1/2 his new character level. Some prestige classes might allow a faster rate of accrual, at the GM’s option.

Action Points and Existing Games
Adding action points to an existing campaign is easy, since characters don’t need to make any special changes. Each character simply gains a number of action points equal to 5 + 1/2 his character level.

NPCs and Action Points
Most NPCs probably shouldn’t have action points, due to the added complexity this would create. In the case of important villains or other significant characters, however, the GM may award them an appropriate number of action points to use against the player characters. A number of action points equal to 1/2 the NPC’s level is a good baseline.

Using Action Points
You can spend 1 action point to add to a single d20 roll.
You can spend 1 action point in a round.

Add to a Roll
When you spend 1 action point to improve a d20 roll, you add the result of a 1d6 to your d20 roll (including attack rolls, saves, checks, or any other roll of a d20) to help you meet or exceed the target number. You can declare the use of 1 action point to alter a d20 roll after the roll is made, but only before the GM reveals the result of that roll. You can’t use an action point to alter the result of a d20 roll when you are taking 10 or taking 20.

Depending on character level (see table), a character might be able to roll more than one d6 when he spends 1 action point. If so, apply the highest result and disregard the other rolls. A 15th-level character, for instance, gets to roll 3d6 and take the best result of the three. So, if he rolled a 1, 2, and 4, he would apply the 4 to his d20 roll.

Character LevelAction Point Dice Rolled
1st-7th1d6
8th-14th2d6
15th-20th3d6

Adventurers' Table Post

House Rule: Animal Companions hit point gain.
Animal Companions gain one additional hit point per level gained by their druid or ranger companion. Adventurers' Table post.

House Rule: Changing characters.
I don't play characters that other people made (nor do other players play mine in games I'm running) - Your characters are always yours. =)

Here's how it works: If any of you chooses to bring another character in, the current character becomes retired. This means that character is put into a form of Temporal Stasis (see Shop Tallk) but with one important difference - that character goes pretty much wherever the player wants them to wind up (within reason) and does not adventure. It's kind of like playing a video game RPG and switching characters - the currently played character gets the experience, loot, etc. while the retired one stays put neither gaining nor losing. Retired characters, being in a form of Temporal Stasis, are also not subject to damage or death.

Basically, you tell me what you want done with that character, and again within reason, I come up with a way to make it happen within the eternal goings-ons of Sharseya.
Adventurers' Table Post

House Rule: Combat - Archery weapons and ammunition damage bonuses stack.
Damage bonuses from magical bows and crossbows (and their like) and their magical ammunition are added together. Their attack bonuses do not stack. I.e. An archer using a +2 longbow and +1 arrows will have a +2 to hit and +3 to damage. This damage is multiplied in the event of a critical hit.

House Rule: Combat - Called Shots.
After researching these rules, I am going to try giving these rules a shot (again, here, and please pardon the pun. =) ). Mind that these rules can be used against your characters too. You don't have to read the whole thing (that's what you have me for), but if you are bored and have the interest, have at. These rules make sense so far. =) Adventurers' Table post.

Called Shots
The Pathfinder Roleplaying Game deals with hits and damage in a rather abstract way, treating almost all hits the same except for the amount and type of damage dealt. With these optional called shot rules, PCs, monsters, and villains alike can aim their attacks more precisely, potentially to devastating effect.

These rules are an optional addition to any campaign, and should be approached with care by the Game Master.

Making Called Shots
A called shot is an attack aimed at a particular part of the body, in the hope of gaining some extra effect from the attack. The smaller or better guarded the area, the more difficult the called shot. A called shot is a single attack made as a full-round action, and thus can't be combined with a charge, feats like Vital Strike, or multiple attacks with a full-attack action.

Called shots are divided into three basic difficulty groups: easy, tricky, and challenging. Easy called shots represent large areas of the body, and are made at a –2 penalty. They have relatively minor effects unless a critical hit is scored or massive damage is dealt. Tricky called shots represent either smaller areas, like a hand, or areas a creature protects well, like its head. Tricky shots receive a –5 penalty, and inflict more serious consequences. Challenging called shots represent very small areas like eyes, fingers, or creatures' necks. They receive a –10 penalty, and successful hits cause significant short-term impairment. Beyond these challenging ratings lie almost impossible called shots that receive a –20 penalty. For called shots against non-humanoid creatures, use common sense and the categories above as guidelines. For example, a flying creature's wings are treated as arms.

Range and Reach: Called shots work best at close range. Melee called shots are at a –2 penalty if the target isn't adjacent to its attacker. For called shots made at range, all range penalties due to range increment are doubled, with a minimum penalty of –2 for any called shot against a target that's not within 30 feet.

Critical Hits and Critical Threats: A called shot has the normal chance for a critical hit, and inflicts an extra effect if one is confirmed. The exact effects of a successful critical hit depend on where the target was hit, and are described under Called Shot Effects.

Additional Rules

Automatic Hits: Some effects in the game, like true strike or the flash of insight ability of cyclopes, provide automatic or nearly automatic hits. Using such an ability on a called shot turns it into a normal attack, with none of the benefits or penalties associated with called shots. From a story perspective, this is because the effect cannot distinguish between a hit in general and a hit in a particular area, but it's also necessary to keep the power of such abilities in line with their original intended effects. Some Game Masters may prefer a more theatrical or dangerous game in which magic can make a shot through the eye nearly certain, in which case this rule can be ignored.

Cover: Cover other than soft cover interferes with a called shot even more than with a normal shot. Double any AC bonuses provided by cover that isn't soft cover. In addition, cover may make certain called shots impossible.

Concealment: The miss chance for a called shot against a creature with concealment increases to 50%. It's not possible to make a called shot against a creature with total concealment. For effects that function like concealment, such as blink and displacement, a miss chance of 50% or more prevents called shots, a miss chance of 20% increases to 50%, and miss chances of other values are doubled.

Damage Reduction: If damage reduction completely negates the damage from a called shot, the called shot has no effect. If hit point damage does get through, the called shot has normal effects. Damage reduction does not reduce any ability damage, ability drain, penalties, or bleed damage caused by the called shot.

Immunity: Immunity to critical hits protects against the extra effects of called shots. Partial protection, such as that provided by the fortification special ability of some magical armors, protects the creature as though the called shot were a critical hit.

Regeneration: Regeneration provides no special protection against called shots, but it might negate or undo some of the effects, such as bleeding or limb loss.

Saving Throws: If a saving throw is allowed on a called shot, the DC is equal to the Armor Class hit by the attack. In the case of an attack roll of a natural 20, the DC is the AC the attack would have hit if 20s did not automatically hit.

Stacking: Unless otherwise stated, penalties for multiple called shots do not stack, even if they are to different areas of the body. Ability damage and drain caused by called shots always stacks.

Touch Attacks: Touch attacks and ranged touch attacks made as called shots must target AC rather than touch AC. This represents the care it takes to target such strikes.

Called Shot Feats
Improved Called Shot:
You are skilled at landing blows right where you want to.
Prerequisites: Int 13, Combat Expertise.
Benefit: You receive a +2 bonus on attack rolls when making a called shot. When taking a full-round or standard action that gives you multiple attacks, you can replace a single attack with a called shot. You may only attempt one called shot per round.
Normal: You can make one called shot per round as a full-round action.

Greater Called Shot: You can make multiple called shots where others could land but one.
Prerequisites: Int 13, Combat Expertise, Improved Called Shot, base attack bonus +6.
Benefit: Whenever you make an attack, you can choose to replace that attack with a called shot. You can make multiple called shots in a single round. Each additional called shot after the first made in the same round takes a –5 penalty. In addition, a called shot that deals half the creature's hit points of damage (minimum 40) is a debilitating blow.
Normal: You can make only one called shot in a round as a full-round action. A called shot that deals 50 points of damage is a debilitating blow.

Called Shot Effects
The consequences of a successful called shot vary depending on whether the hit is a normal hit, a critical hit, or a debilitating blow (a hit for 50 points of damage or more). When more than one limb or organ can be affected by a called shot, the attacker can choose the target if desired; otherwise, it should be determined randomly.

Called Shot: An attack aimed at a body part that deals fewer than 50 points of damage results in a normal called shot. Called shots inflict either minor penalties or temporary inconveniences.

Critical Called Shot: When a called shot is confirmed as a critical hit but deals fewer than half the creature's hit points of damage (minimum 50), a critical called shot results. Critical called shots can cause ability damage, bleeding, and other serious effects.

Debilitating Blow: A called shot that deals half the creature's hit points of damage (minimum 50) or more (whether a critical hit or not) results in a debilitating blow that has extra effects. A debilitating blow inflicts major consequences and potentially permanent consequences.

Concentration Checks: Concentration checks forced by called shots to parts of the body involved in spellcasting (generally the head for spells with verbal components, and the casting arm and hand for spells with somatic components) are made at a –5 penalty.

Healing Called Shot Effects: Some called shot effects render a given location useless until healed. Remedying this condition requires the victim be healed (naturally or magically, and by one or more sources of healing) for as many hit points of damage as the called shot caused. If the victim is suffering from multiple wounds of this sort, divide healing equally between them. The regenerate spell repairs any and all effects of called shots except for ability damage and ability drain.

Table: Called Shot Locations

Location Type Penalty
Head Tricky –5
Ear Challenging –10
Eye Challenging –10
Neck Challenging –10
Chest Easy –2
Heart Challenging –10
Vitals Tricky –5
Arm Easy –2
Hand Tricky –5
Leg Easy –2

Arm
Ams are the manipulating limbs of a creature, including tentacles. Wings are also considered to be arms for purposes of a called shot. Called shots to the arm are easy (–2 penalty).
Called Shot: A called shot to an arm deals no additional damage, but for 1d4 rounds, any attack rolls, ability checks, or skill checks made using the wounded arm take a –2 penalty. A flying creature shot in the wing must make a Fly check to avoid descending involuntarily .
Critical Called Shot: A critical hit to the arm deals 1d4 points of Dexterity damage and 1d4 points of Strength damage. A successful Fortitude saving throw halves the ability damage (minimum 1 point to each attribute). The target also suffers the effects of a called shot to the arm for 1d4 minutes.
Debilitating Blow: A debilitating blow deals 1d6 points of Dexterity damage and 1d6 points of Strength damage. The blow renders the arm useless until healed unless the target succeeds at a Fortitude saving throw. If the saving throw fails by 5 or more, the arm is severed or otherwise mangled such that only regeneration or similar effects can repair it. The target also suffers the effects of a called shot to the arm (if the arm remains usable) for 2d6 minutes.

Chest
Called shots to the chest are aimed at the well-protected center of mass of a creature. Called shots to the chest are easy (–2 penalty).
Called Shot: A called shot to the chest deals no additional damage, but any skill checks caused by the hit (such as an Acrobatics check while balancing or a Climb check while climbing) take a –2 penalty.
Critical Called Shot: A critical hit to the chest deals 1d4 points of Constitution damage and fatigues the target. A successful Fortitude saving throw (made after the Constitution damage is applied) negates the fatigue. The creature also suffers the effects of a called shot to the chest.
Debilitating Blow: A debilitating blow to the chest deals 2d4 points of Constitution damage and exhausts the target. A successful Fortitude saving throw (made after the Constitution damage is applied) reduces the exhaustion to fatigue. If the saving throw fails by 5 or more, the creature's internal injuries deal 1 point of Constitution damage in any round the creature takes a standard action. The internal injuries can be healed by either a DC 25 Heal check or by healing as many hit points as the debilitating blow dealt, whether by magical or natural means. The creature also suffers the effects of a called shot to the chest.

Ear
Ears are the organs used to hear. Creatures without visible ears generally aren't susceptible to called shots to that location. Called shots to the ear are challenging (–10 penalty).
Called Shot: A called shot to the ear deafens that ear for 1 round, and imposes a –2 penalty on Perception checks. A creature that loses hearing in all ears is deafened until hearing is returned by way of the remove blindness/deafness spell or a similar effect.
Critical Called Shot: A critical hit to the ear deafens that ear for 2d6 minutes and leaves the target staggered for 1 round. The target also suffers the effects of a called shot to the ear for that duration.
Debilitating Blow: A debilitating blow to the ear destroys that ear and stuns the target for 1 round, then leaves it staggered for 1d4 rounds, and deafened until removed with the remove blindness/deafness spell or a similar effect. A successful Fortitude saving throw deafens the creature until it is restored by the remove blindness/deafness spell or a similar effect.

Eye
Eyes include whatever organs a creature uses to see. At the Game Master's discretion, a called shot to the eye can also target sensory organs such as antennae, potentially negating abilities like blindsense. Generally, a creature can't be blinded until it has lost all vision in all of its eyes. Creatures with five or more eyes take no penalties from called shots to their eyes until they're blinded in enough eyes to bring them down a single functional eye, but can still be blinded in that eye by a critical hit or debilitating blow. Called shots to the eye are challenging (–10 penalty).
Called Shot: A called shot to the eye gives all of the target's foes concealment against its attacks for 1 round and gives it a –2 penalty on Perception checks. If the creature only has one functional eye prior to the called shot, it is blinded for 1 round instead.
Critical Called Shot: A critical hit to the eye costs the target sight in that eye for 1d4 minutes. The target also suffers the effects of a called shot to the eye for that duration.
Debilitating Blow: A debilitating blow to the eye destroys that eye, causes blindness until the condition is removed with a remove blindness/deafness spell or similar effect, and deals 1d6 points of bleed damage. A successful Reflex saving throw reduces this to 1d4 hours of loss of sight in that eye and eliminates the bleeding. The target also suffers the effects of a called shot to the eye for 2d6 minutes.

Hand
Hands include most extremities used for fine manipulation. Called shots to the hand are tricky (–5 penalty).
Called Shot: For 1d4 rounds, any attack rolls, damage rolls, ability checks, or skill checks made using the wounded hand take a –2 penalty, including attack and damage rolls with two-handed weapons. In addition, the target takes a –4 penalty to its CMD to resist disarm attempts, and drops its weapon (if any) on an attack roll result of a natural 1.
Critical Called Shot: A critical hit to the hand deals 1d4 points of Dexterity damage. In addition, the target drops anything it is holding in that hand unless it succeeds at a Reflex saving throw. Items held in two hands aren't dropped, but the target still loses its grip with the injured hand. The target also suffers the effects of a called shot to the hand for 1d4 minutes.
Debilitating Blow: A debilitating blow deals 1d6 points of Dexterity damage. The blow renders the hand useless until healed unless the target succeeds at a Reflex saving throw. If the saving throw fails by 5 or more, the hand is severed or otherwise mangled such that only regeneration or similar effects can repair it. Regardless of the result of the saving throw, anything held in the wounded hand is automatically dropped, even items held in two or more hands. The target also suffers the effects of a called shot to the hand (if the hand remains usable) for 2d6 minutes.

Head
Called shots to the head are tricky (–5 penalty), as most creatures show some skill at dodging attacks aimed at their faces. Some creatures, such as otyughs and purple worms, lack a proper head altogether. Creatures with multiple heads must be hit by called shots to all their heads in a single round to suffer ill effects, and even then, only suffer the least effect that is inflicted on any single head (so for example, an ettin would need to take critical hits to both heads to receive the effects of a critical called shot to the head).
Called Shot: A called shot to the head leaves the target sickened for 1d4 rounds.
Critical Called Shot: A critical hit to the head deals 1d6 points of Intelligence, Wisdom, or Charisma damage (randomly determine which) and staggers the target for 1d4 rounds. A successful Fortitude saving throw prevents the target from being staggered. The target also suffers the effects of a called shot to the head for 1d4 minutes.
Debilitating Blow: A debilitating blow to the head deals 1d6 points of Intelligence, Wisdom, and Charisma damage (roll separately for each), and knocks the target unconscious for 1d10 rounds. A successful Fortitude saving throw prevents the target from being knocked unconscious, but leaves it staggered for 1d10 rounds instead. If the saving throw fails by 5 or more, the target is rendered senseless by severe brain trauma (as thefeeblemind spell) until it receives a heal, greater restoration, or similar effect. The target also suffers the effects of a called shot to the head for 2d6 minutes.

Heart
A called shot to the heart represents an attempt at a killing blow. If the hit isn't either a critical hit or a debilitating blow, the attempt fails and is just a normal hit. A called shot to the heart can be used for any small, likely fatal location on a creature, such as the only weakness on an unimaginably ancient red dragon. Called shots to the heart are challenging (–10 penalty).
Called Shot: A called shot to the heart is just a normal hit with no extra effect.
Critical Called Shot: A critical hit to the heart pierces the organ, causing exhaustion and 1d4 points of Constitution bleed damage. A successful Fortitude save reduces this to fatigue and 1 point of Constitution bleed damage. In either case, stopping the bleeding requires either regeneration(spell or special ability), magic healing that heals as many points of damage (from one or more sources) as the original blow dealt, or a successful DC 20 heal check that takes 1d4 rounds to complete.
A critical hit to the heart against a vampire made with a piercing weapon composed entirely of wood leaves the vampire impaled through the heart by the weapon if it fails its Fortitude save.
Debilitating Blow: A debilitating blow to the heart destroys it, instantly killing any creature that relies on its heart to survive. Creatures that succeed at a Fortitude save suffer exhaustion and take 1d6 points of Constitution damage and 1d4 points of Constitution bleed damage, as do creatures that can survive without a heart.
A debilitating blow to the heart against a vampire made with a piercing weapon made entirely of wood affects the vampire as a critical hit to the heart; for example, it still receives a Fortitude save to avoid the consequences.

Leg
Legs are the ambulatory limbs of a creature, including feet. Called shots to the leg have no special effect on creatures with five or more legs. Called shots to the leg are easy (–2 penalty).
Called Shot: A called shot to a leg lowers the target creature's speed by 10 feet for 1d4 rounds if it has two or fewer legs, and by 5 feet if it has three or four legs. In either case, the creature's speed cannot be reduced below 5 feet per round. Called shots to the leg have no effect on creatures with five or more legs. Hitting the same leg more than once has no extra effect, but the speed penalty for hits on different legs stack. Additionally, any skill or ability checks involving movement (such as Acrobatics or Swim checks) take a –2 penalty for 1d4 rounds.
Critical Called Shot: A critical hit to the leg deals 1d4 points of Dexterity damage and knocks the target prone. A successful Fortitude save keeps the creature from falling prone. The creature also suffers the effects of a called shot to the leg for 1d4 minutes.
Debilitating Blow: A debilitating blow to the leg knocks the creature prone. The blow renders the leg entirely useless until healed unless the target succeeds at a Fortitude saving throw. If the saving throw fails by 5 or more, the leg is severed or otherwise mangled such that only regeneration or similar effects can repair it. If the save succeeds, the target is instead lamed and moves at half speed until the leg is healed, or until it receives a successful DC 20 Heal check. A creature with a useless or severed leg moves at half speed if it still has more than half of its legs usable; otherwise, it cannot stand up and must crawl to move. The target also suffers the effects of a called shot to the leg (if the leg remains usable) for 2d6 minutes.

Neck
The neck makes for a difficult but rewarding target. Injuries to the neck keep a creature from speaking easily, and if blood vessels or the windpipe are damaged, such injuries rapidly lead to death. Creatures that lack vulnerable heads generally can't be attacked in the neck either. Called shots to the neck are challenging (–10 penalty).
Called Shot: A called shot to the neck makes speaking above a hoarse whisper impossible for 1 round. Spells with verbal components have a 20% chance of failing outright, as do attempts to activate command-word items (although for magic items, the use of the item is not wasted).
Critical Called Shot: A critical hit to the neck deals 1d6 points of bleed damage. In addition, the target must succeed at a Fortitude saving throw or suffer a crushed windpipe and be unable to breathe or speak, possibly suffocating . A crushed windpipe can be repaired by magical healing (from one or more sources) that heals as many hit points of damage as the original hit dealt, or by a DC 25 Heal check to open up a hole into the windpipe. The latter check deals 2d6 hit points of damage, and leaves the creature still unable to speak. If target makes its saving throw, it still suffers the effects of a called shot to the neck for 1d4 minutes.
Debilitating Blow: A debilitating blow to the neck leaves the target unable to speak or breathe and deals 1d4 points of Constitution bleed damage. A successful Fortitude saving throw reduces this to 2d6 points of regular (hit point) bleed damage, and the target is only unable to speak and breathe for 1d4 minutes. The Constitution bleed damage caused by a debilitating blow to the neck can only be stopped by regeneration (spell or special ability), magical healing (from one or more sources) that heals as many points of damage as the original blow dealt, or a DC 20 Heal check that takes 1d4 rounds to complete.

Vitals
The vitals correspond to the abdomen on a humanoid: critical organs not well-protected by bone. Attacks on the vitals can also include dastardly “low blows.” Vitals for non-humanoid creatures can include nearly any location that is relatively hard to hit, poorly protected, and debilitating if struck. Called shots to the vitals are tricky (–5 penalty).
Called Shot: A called shot to the vitals leaves the target sickened for 1d4 rounds. A successful Fortitude save reduces this duration to 1 round. While sickened from the blow, the target cannot run or charge.
Critical Called Shot: A critical hit deals 1d4 points of Constitution damage. In addition, the target is nauseated for 1d4 rounds and sickened for 1d6 minutes. A successful Fortitude saving throw negates the nauseated condition. While the target is sickened from the blow, it cannot run or charge.
Debilitating Blow: A debilitating blow to the vitals deals 1d6 points of Constitution drain, nauseates the target for 1d4 rounds, and sickens it for 2d6 minutes. A successful Fortitude save reduces the drain to damage and the nausea to 1 round. If the save fails by 5 or more, the target is disemboweled or otherwise horrifically wounded, and takes 1 point of Constitution bleed damage. The Constitution bleed damage caused by a debilitating blow to the vitals can only be stopped by regeneration (spell or special ability), magical healing that heals as many points of damage (from one or more sources) as the original blow dealt, or a DC 20 Heal check that takes 1d4 rounds to complete.

House Rule: Crafting Time is "+1 per day."
In other words, a +1 spear will take one day to successfully craft. A full set of +2 armor (regardless of type) will take 2 days and so forth up to +4 (+5 items are a minimum of 10 days to successfully craft). This House Rule applies to typical magical items and not specialty items like named items or artifacts. Also, a crafter can still add +5 to the DC to halve the time if they desire.

Otherwise it will take Bronze the better part of a month in-game time to finish one suit of armor made from the Craven hide (4 days for +2 armor, and 18 more for Energy Resistance!). It bears understanding - In Pathfinder's current rules, magical items take the longest time to make (one day for each 1,000 gold piece value of the base price). So, making Mamapaw, say, a large-sized full suit of leather armor +2 (base price: 8,000 g.p.) would take 8 days. Plus, because the leather you're using comes from the Craven (and is therefore energy resistant), tack on 18 more days? Yikes! At the rate we're playing, Killfire can shelve his crafter, Bronze, for the next couple of Real Time months! Adventurers' Table Post

House Rule: Dice are nice... (and we roll mine until we get a dice roller). =)
Folks, as you know, we have no RpN dice roller. As your fair and fun-minded Game Master, I require a method in which I can verify every roll made. This means I cannot use dice rollers from across the Internet as there is no way to doubtlessly prove the result. Why? Mainly because a person, if they so chose, could roll 12 times until they got the result they wanted and everyone in this game would be none the wiser. Not that I expect any such behavior, of course, but it remains my way to verify die rolls with my own two eyes.

So... as we've done in Sharseya, so shall we do here. I am the proud owner of a great deal of real dice. Each of you pick a color and I'll roll the one you picked here at my computer desk.

Doing this enables me to doubtlessly (there's that word again) verify the results of your roll while giving you some kind of choice in the tool deciding your character's success or failure.

It was difficult to choose 10 out of the dozens that I own, but it got done. So, without further ado, here are your d20 selections from left to right, top to bottom:

Dice Are Nice 0218172043.jpg

1. White
2. Silver
3. Yellow
4. Orange
5. Red/White
6. Smooth Red
7. Purple
8. Blue
9. Aquamarine
10. Green/Black

House Rule: Equipment - If it's not on your character sheet, your character probably doesn't have it.
Note to myself: I reworded this to the above statement; it seems to work better. Below is an excerpt from my line of thinking at the time.

Oh. And, since it's come up, I hope folks don't mind me bringing up yet another House Rule. This one saves a lot of confusion in the long run...

"If it is on your character sheet, your character has it."

It happens. Everyone is ready to game around the table, munchies and dice at the ready, music in the background, and a good time ahead for all. Then one of the players starts talking about the new item the party has decided to share and how much he or she enjoys having it. Then another player speaks up saying that they thought another character had it. So who in the heck has the thing?

Easy fix: Check your character sheets. =) When a "party item" goes from one PC's inventory to another, I tell them. "Mark it down. Erase it from the first player, and add it to the second. The item has not changed hands until this happens." Then everyone knows without a doubt, even a week or two later, where that possibly very important little item is.

Another thing this helps with is when your characters find themselves in a bind (let me guess - none of you think that would happen in our game! Naaaah! =) ), sometimes a PC will whip something out and use it, causing another player to say, "Hey! There's no way you've been carrying around that ball of string and needles all this time!" And the first player can say, "Oh yes, she has. It's right here. See? She even has them here in a nice little pouch we bought back in Glimmerdawn." Players: "Ohhhh...." (translation: "I wish I'd thought of that..."). =)

These are the things that your character can say in almost all cases, "Yes, that is my property, and I have it on my person." The only thing that comes to mind that still ought to be on one's character sheet are mounts. They're carrying you around, right? If you're carrying them, then I think you'll look silly. =) Note that mounts, familiars, and animal companions sometimes come with cool little accessories (ask one of our players about his Awakened squirrel who wears a powerful Ring of Protection around the base of his tail!).

Any questions, friends? =) Adventurers' Table Post.

House Rule: Equipment, new item - Maul (two-handed hammer).
The two-handed hammer (or maul). This weapon is effectively a two-handed warhammer. Cost: 12 g.p. Dmg (S): d8. Dmg (M): d10. Critical: x3. Weight: 10 pounds. Damage type: Bludgeoning. Special: -. In Conversation, page 4.

House Rule: Equipment - Spell Components.
Casters, unless you have the "Eschew Materials" feat, please place an item called "Spell Components" on your inventory sheet. These pouches, bag, whatever, contains and covers all mundane and typical spell components that each of your characters need to cast their spells (and no, I'm not going to make the casters buy this sort of thing). Mind, any special or expensive spell components must be purchased (the Cleric's holy or unholy water and incense worth 500 gold to cast the Commune spell is a good example). Also note that in almost all cases, spell components are not used up when the spell is cast. Adventurers' Table post.

House Rule: You may swap out one Feat for free when your character trains for the next level.
Pathfinder wants you to spend gold and time to retrain a feat. I'm willing to see that happen, but given how a week in game time can be forever in Real Life, I want another option and here it is - When your character trains, you may swap out ONE Feat without the gold or time cost if you so choose. It may NOT be a prerequisite Feat. In other words, if your character has Dodge and Mobility (the latter needing the former prerequisite), Dodge has to stay. If you absolutely want to swap out Dodge, you must get rid of everything you stacked on top of it first (in this case, Mobility).

House Rule: Fumble chart.
If your character rolls a one in combat, please roll again. If the second roll is a 1-5, the failure compounds into a fumble. If that happens, please roll percentile (d100). The same fumble table is used for good guys as well as bad. The higher the roll, the worse the results, but some of our fumbles in our tabletop game have been more memorable than our crits (critical hits). =) Adventurers' Table post.

House Rule: Half-breeds.
I must say at this point on Sharseya, there are no half-ogres, half-angels, quarter-demon/quarter-dark elf with half hobbit or whatever creatures running around. Mind, I am not saying anyone is trying to play such; I have simply had enough players in previous tabletop games who did not seem to believe their characters were special enough without trying to roll one... You will never have to worry about running into this "munchkin" style foe in this game. =) In Conversation, page 17.

House Rule: Hit points (re-rolling ones; choice of rolling or choosing the just-above-average result).
When rolling for hit points, 5th Edition D&D allows a PC to instead choose the result that is just above average on the die. This is especially reasonable for PCs who roll poorly and often. For example, if a Fighter normally rolls a d10, the PC can choose 6 (just above the 5.5 average result on a d10). A d8 character can choose a result of 5, etc.

If you decide to roll the dice, I let my players reroll results of one on the die. My game can be deadly enough as it is... Also, as I think was mentioned, first-level characters receive maximum hit points. In Conversation, page 4.

House Rule: Initiative - Ties and established party members.
When two allied characters end up with the same Initiative result (which is not necessarily the result of the die rolls), I have a House Rule that says those two may decide between them who goes first. This only applies in teams that know each other well ("established"). This is a benefit born of experience through teamwork.

If the two want to roll off instead of decide, they may do so. The result puts the winner up a decimal point in the Initiative ranking.

Here is an example: Two PCs get an Initiative result of 10. They roll off (straight d20 roll only - no modifiers). The winner's result is a 10.1, not 11. This way, there are no roll-offs with anyone whose Initiative resulted in 11. The loser of this roll-off stays at 10.

Note: The page I had this linked to got eaten when we transferred to RpN 2.0, so I'm rewriting the rule to make it clear and easy to use.

House Rule: Initiative - Rule of 1 and Rule of 20 on Initiative.
House Rule: Rule of 1 on Initiative. Any roll of 1 on Initiative means your character goes dead last (regardless of bonuses). Yes, this applies to bad guys too. This is in effect so creatures and characters with outrageous Initiative modifiers can still fall to the luck of the draw.

House Rule: Rule of 20 on Initiative. Regardless of modifiers, any character or creature that rolls a natural 20 on Initiative goes first. In the case of two such rolls, characters roll off. Adventurers' Table Post for both rules.

House Rule: Magical items. Recharging items can now be done with Recharge Item spell.
Re: Adventurers' Table Post #3302 (look there to find the discussion).
I think I'm happy with the idea of a spell providing a caster the ability to recharge whatever item is in question as they apparently did in one of the Dragon Magazines back in the 1980s. Lacking that information, I'll just create a spell called Recharge Item. I've written it up in the spoiler below.

Recharge Item
School alteration; Level Bard 3, Cleric 4, Druid 4, Sorcerer 4, Wizard 4.
Casting Time 1 standard action
Components V, S, M (item to be recharged)
Range touch
Target living creature touched
Duration 10 minutes
Saving Throw none; Spell Resistance no

You can cast this spell upon yourself or another living spellcaster in order to recharge a magic item. When this spell is cast, a glowing aura appears around the item. The spell recipient must know the spell(s) required to recharge the item (a Sorcerer must know Magic Missile in order to recharge a Wand of Magic Missiles). Items that do not have specific spells, such as a Ring of Shooting Stars, may have special spell requirements (DMs approval). The spell recipient may then begin casting their spells into the aura with the sole intent of recharging the item. Casting any spells upon the item in question without this intent results in the spell having its normal effect (and no charges are restored into the item).
The spells cast upon the item recharge a number of charges equal to the level of the spell (a Wizard's Fireball spell restores 3 charges).
Recharge Item cannot be made permanent with a permanency spell.

House Rule: Magical items. Some require no skill to use.
There are some items in my game that, while magical, require no special training to use. You might recall the Wand of Cat's Grace on the Starting Magical Items table? Just know its password and point. The last thing your Storyteller here wants is for only one or two persons in your team to be able to make use of an important item like the Cudgel of the Wayfarer (and heaven forbid, a one is rolled, or no one in your party rolled a person who chose Use Magical Device). Adventurers' Table post (in the spoiler).

House Rule: Magical Items. Wands can be recharged.
(Taken from Adventurers Table, Entry #2563)
In Sharseya (which takes from 1st Edition in some places including here), some wands can be recharged, others cannot. It all depends on the wand in question. This is different than Pathfinder where wands cannot be recharged at all.

So, which wands can be recharged? I use Dungeon Masters Guide 1st Edition to help with that. Typically speaking, wands with common spells (like the Wand of Magic Missiles you're looking forward to making for Luna) can be recharged while wands with very special powers (like the feared Wand of Negation or the outrageous Wand of Wonder) cannot be recharged. =)

House Rule: Mithril Coins
(From Adventurers' Table #2605 on page 105.)
Concerning Mithril Coins, I'm going to make a change here. Each Mithril Coin will be worth 100 gold pieces (not 1,000). It makes sense to me to go up the natural progression of coinage (copper, silver, gold, platinum, now mithril) instead of skipping a space.

House Rule: Silent Perception checks.
Since the start of this game, I have been rolling Perception checks for the whole party when they come up (Otiorin noticing Bilal coming down the hall while Otiorin was chatting with Sarissa is one example). I do this because I see it both as a time-saver (we don't have to wait for everyone to see a dice roll request, and then each player posts and rolls, and once all that's done, I post the results. That process alone will likely take a few Real Life days every time it comes up, and the story stops cold during the wait), and because asking PCs for a Perception check is a very clear way to warn them something they don't know about is out there (which nerfs any surprise in the storyline while possibly creating other issues, player paranoia among them - it's happened in my games). Plus, when they roll, they instantly know their result. Player sez, "Oh, I got a total of 25. No one else needs to bother to check since I rolled that high. Let's have them do something else while my character is searching."

As an example, would any of you been surprised if I had instead asked Sherwood and Kaerri to roll Perception checks for Luna and Kitrin to notice Bilal's attendant had locked them in that bedroom? I doubt it. The players would have suspected something was up the moment I asked for a roll. Players aren't stupid (well, most aren't. There's always an exception somewhere, and the same certainly goes for Storytellers, DMs, Referees, etc. =) ).

So, when Luna goes searching through the cage room for any clues, I would like to be the one making the roll for these reasons. Adventurers' Table post.

House Rule: Signature Abilities.
One element I am adding to everyone in your team is a Signature Ability. This is a passive feat or feat-like ability, chosen at character creation, that stems from your character (as opposed to race, class, etc.). And it will serve you for as long as you play that character.

Examples include Kitrin (Kaerri's tenacious hobbit fighter). She will, despite her Small size, hit like a Medium-sized creature (short swords do d6 instead of d4 for her, etc.). Why? Because it is in her personality and training to do so.

Your hit-point-restoring person will have "Unbalance Opponent", a feat from Modern d20, that outright negates the Strength bonus "to hit" (but not damage!).

Signature Abilities come at no cost to the character. So, create one that tells something about your character. Maybe it's an ability born of background or personality or just plain something he has always been good at. In Conversation, page 1.

(Also... From Adventurers' Table #2543, page #102)

Signature Abilities... are a culmination of a character's skills, talents, and things the character has a penchant for. I take into account the overall character level, previous Signature Abilities, and (here's a big one) what that character practices (notice I didn't say "What they like..." but what they're naturally good at or have become good at).

I can see someone like Luna having Fire Resistance 5 (or maybe 10 down the road at the cost of one Signature Ability) if she starts working towards it. True, Luna has a natural influence and talent with that most unpredictable of elements, but up until this point her use of fire magic has been totally offensive in nature. As far as I can remember, she hasn't taken fire damage since we started the game (has she?). So why would she have a resistance toward it? That's kind of like giving Bria a bonus to damage. =)

I going to think out loud here. Wolf has a lifelong love of nature and its creatures. I felt it was only natural for him to have Speak with Animals at will. Same goes for Sabrefang. Same goes for Powerpaw's Immunity to Fear. It's something that's clearly and naturally part of that character. It makes sense for them to have (or earn).

Allow me to bring up an NPC I've had around for a few years. The character was burned horribly as a child (and worse), yet survived. As a result, he had a terrible phobia of fire. However, the right people took him in and as his growing years went by, he was taught the secrets of fire by those who took him in. He learned so much about what flame could and could not do (with the intent of losing his phobia and fortifying himself against flame) that he became fire-resistant at first, more fire-resistant later, and now, finally, after long years of practice, dedication, and sacrifice, he's only one of two characters in my entire game who has become completely immune to fire damage of any kind (magical or otherwise). He spent, if memory serves, three separate Signature Ability "slots" (if you like the term) and many, many burns making this reality. While he can still be blinded by a fire's light and is still subject to injury and death from smoke inhalation, etc., he can walk right through a Wall of Fire and take no damage.

And I think that's worth what he put into it. =)

Think along these lines when creating your own character's Signature Abilities.

House Rule: Skills - Skill Ranks (Rule of 5).
Skills at ranks 5, 10, 15, and 20 provide "unlockable" benefits.

That-which-counts-as-ranks towards this rule are: Skill points spent in a skill, the +3 class skill bonus, the Skill Focus feat, and any racial abilities a character may have. Nothing else (items, high attributes, etc.). Plus, this only applies to "passive" skills. In other words, regardless of your ranks in Disable Device or Bluff, expect to roll. That trap is not going to disarm itself and that person is not automatically going to be fooled.

Here is how the first benefit works: A character who has 10 skill ranks (not total) in Perception might get a roll whereas the rest of the party just plain won't detect something (and get no roll). As another example, a character who has 5 ranks in Acrobatics might be able to reach a ledge or cross a rope that others simply cannot attempt due to the level of difficulty. Dice are one thing, but this is simply an added benefit to the characters who have pushed themselves to be truly skilled in something. And no, you don't need any skills with 5 or higher ranks to survive. =)

Another benefit comes later. A character won't have to make a roll in some circumstances. Say your character has 15 ranks in Knowledge: Spellcraft. There are things your character has studied so much that they will come automatically (like perhaps automatically recognizing 1st level spells regardless of who or what is casting it). Have 15 ranks in Swim? You don't need to roll to cross that raging river everyone else is tremendously scared of - in fact, you are probably the only one who can cross it, get that fellow party member to climb on you, and make the swim back (and that might require a roll, but... only someone with that kind of skill can make the attempt). Adjust your characters skills accordingly if you so desire. In Conversation, page 10.

House Rule: Training for the next level of experience.
(Reference Post #3067). Characters will require trainers to rise to the next level of experience for as long as this game is played.

NEW FEATS
Improved Called Shot: You are skilled at landing blows right where you want to.
Prerequisites: Int 13, Combat Expertise.
Benefit: You receive a +2 bonus on attack rolls when making a called shot. When taking a full-round or standard action that gives you multiple attacks, you can replace a single attack with a called shot. You may only attempt one called shot per round.
Normal: You can make one called shot per round as a full-round action.

Greater Called Shot: You can make multiple called shots where others could land but one.
Prerequisites: Int 13, Combat Expertise, Improved Called Shot, base attack bonus +6.
Benefit: Whenever you make an attack, you can choose to replace that attack with a called shot. You can make multiple called shots in a single round. Each additional called shot after the first made in the same round takes a –5 penalty. In addition, a called shot that deals half the creature's hit points of damage (minimum 40) is a debilitating blow.
Normal: You can make only one called shot in a round as a full-round action. A called shot that deals 50 points of damage is a debilitating blow.

DISALLOWED FEATS
Arcane Discoveries. Adventurers' Table Post.
Bleeding Critical.
Clustered Shots. Adventurers' Table Post.
Spell Specialization. Adventurers' Table Post.

NEW SKILLS
Knowledge: Monster Lore (Int - trained only). You are trained in the study of monsters and monster-like creatures, their behaviors, habits, languages (if any), fighting abilities, and history. All types of monsters are covered by this skill (Undead, Magical Beasts, etc.). This training allows you to properly identify a creature native to the area in which you studied (requires DM approval).

Properly identifying a monster can also lead to social and combat-related knowledge (usual alignment of the species, well-known special abilities like the petrifying stare of a medusa, vulnerabilities, special defenses, and the like). The higher you roll, the more you know overall.

Once a roll is made, it is recommended to create a list on your character sheet to see which monsters you can readily identify and to what degree of knowledge is known ("Drow Elves - rolled DC 20" might include typical data on Drow Elves including their spell-like abilities, aversion to sunlight, their worship of Lolth, and some of their history, but such a roll would not include secretive data like the antidotes or ingredients to Drow-made poison, for example).

Some monsters require no roll if they are very common to your area (goblins make a good example). Other monsters are not subject to Knowledge: Monster Lore if there was no way you could have learned about them (for example, Yuan-Ti. There are no Yuan-Ti on your side of Sharseya. Period. However, characters learned in the fabled, sun-lit deserts and jungles of Rhumia, know quite well what these foul terrors are. On the other side of the coin, someone from Rhumia would have no clue what Otiorin is because he is a half-elf, and they are not native to that realm). =)

This brings up a point I've been meaning to make for a little while. The various knowledge skills cover their own studies plus certain "families" of monsters, but no one skill covers them all.

For example, Otiorin can roll on dragons because of his study of Knowledge: Arcana, but not sylvan creatures (like pixies or nymphs) because he has no ranks in Knowledge: Nature. Luna can pretty much attempt a roll on almost any creature you meet, given her wide variety of ranks among the Knowledge skills, but with 2 ranks in most of them, she is not likely to make rolls on any but common and uncommon creatures. To cover this, there is a skill I created a long time ago that I would like to make available here.

Monster Lore provides tactical, social, and historical data only. It cannot tell you why the hill giants are chasing the hippogriffs, just that the hill giants are known for being very good rock-throwers, and might use boulders to take down their prey, as they are not likely to think of much more given their dull brains. As always, your GM has final approval on what your character knows and does not know.

So... if you care to, I will allow some small rearrangement of skill points for interested characters to learn this valuable skill. Yes, this means taking from skills you already have if you would like the skill now, or waiting until you reach the next level of experience if you don't.

As usual, bring on your questions if you're curious. =) Adventurers' Table Post.

NEW SPELLS
Ball Lightning .Adventurers' Table post.

Burning Disarm. Adventurers' Table post.

Carry Companion. Adventurers' Table post.

Close Wounds. Adventurers' Table post.
(From Miniatures Handbook, pg 34)
Conjuration (Healing)
Level: Clr 3, Hlr 3
Components: V
Casting Time: 1 swift action
Range: Close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels)
Target: One creature
Duration: Instantaneous
Saving Throw: Will half (harmless); see text; Spell Resistance: Yes (harmless)

This spell cures 2d4 points of damage.

You can cast this spell with an instant utterance. You may even cast this spell when it isn't your turn. If you cast this spell immediately after the subject takes damage, it effectively prevents the damage. It would keep alive someone who had just dropped to -10 hit points, for example, leaving the character at negative hit points, but stable.

Used against an undead creature, close wounds deals damage instead of curing the creature (which takes half damage if it makes a Will saving throw).

Ear-piercing Scream. Adventurers' Table post.
School evocation [sonic]; Level bard 1, sorcerer/wizard 1,
Casting Time 1 standard action
Components V, S
Range close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels)
Target one creature
Duration instantaneous; see text
Saving Throw Fortitude partial (see text); Spell Resistance yes

You unleash a powerful scream, inaudible to all but a single target. The target is dazed for 1 round and takes 1d6 points of sonic damage per two caster levels (maximum 5d6). A successful save negates the daze effect and halves the damage.

Enhance Ability
The 5E D&D spell Enhance Ability and Mass Enhance Ability replaces all of the standard ability-raising spells (Bull's Strength, Fox's Cunning, Owl's Wisdom, Cat's Grace, Bear's Endurance, Eagle's Splendor) and wraps them up all up into one spell. The caster selects which Ability Score to improve upon casting the spell.

Gravity Bow. In Conversation, page 21.

Hardening
DM note: There is a version of this spell in Eberon that provides 1 Hardness/level.
Hardening
School
transmutation; Level artifice 7, sorcerer/wizard 6

CASTING
Casting Time 1 standard action
Components V, S

EFFECT
Range touch
Target one item of a volume no greater than 10 cu. ft./level
Duration permanent
Saving Throw none; Spell Resistance yes (object)

DESCRIPTION
This spell increases the hardness of materials by 1 point per 2 caster levels. The hardening spell does not in any way affect resistance to other forms of transformation.

This spell affects up to 10 cubic feet per level. If cast upon a metal or mineral, the spell affects 1 cubic foot per level.

Ice Slick. Adventurers' Table post (#2498)
School evocation [cold]; Level druid 2, magus 2, ranger 2, sorcerer/wizard 2
Casting Time 1 standard action
Components V, S
Range close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels), Area 5-ft.-radius burst
Duration instantaneous (see text)
Saving Throw Reflex partial (see text); Spell Resistance see text

You create a blast of intense cold, coating all solid surfaces in the area with a thin coating of ice.

Any creature in the area when the spell is cast takes 1d6 points of cold damage + 1 point per caster level (maximum +10) and falls prone; creatures that succeed at a Reflex save take half damage and don't fall prone. Spell resistance applies to this initial effect.

A creature can walk within or through the area of ice at half its normal speed with a successful DC 10 Acrobatics check. Failure by 4 or less means the creature can't move that round (and must succeed at a Reflex save or fall); failure by 5 or more means it falls (see the Acrobatics skill). Creatures that do not move on their turn do not need to attempt this check.

A 5-foot square of ice has hardness 0 and 3 hit points. The ice is an instantaneous effect, but persists as non-magical ice. Under temperate conditions, the ice lasts 1 minute per level. In tropical environments, it might last only half as long. In cold environments where ice and snow persist without melting, it could last indefinitely.

Mage Armor II and Mage Armor III (both spells are on the same web-page). Adventurers' Table post.

Panacea.
(From Miniatures Handbook, pg 37)
School Conjuration (Healing), Level: Clr 4, Drd 5, Hlr 4.
Components V, S
Casting Time 1 standard action
Range Touch
Target Creature touched
Duration Instantaneous
Saving Throw Will half (harmless), see text. Spell Resistance Yes (harmless)

This spell channels positive energy into a creature to wipe away afflictions. It immediately ends any of the following conditions affecting the target: blinded, confused, dazed, dazzled, deafened, diseased, exhausted, fatigued, frightened, nauseated, panicked, paralyzed, shaken sickened, and stunned. It negates sleep effects and the effect of the feeblemind spell, and ends any additional effects from poison, as the neutralize poison spell. It also cures 1d8 points of damage + 1 per caster level (up to +20).

Panacea does not remove ability damage, negative levels, or permanently drained levels. It does not remove conditions caused by spells of 7th level or higher, or by spells or effects that cannot be dispelled.

Used against an undead creature, panacea deals damage instead of curing the creature (which takes half damage if it makes a Will saving throw), but it has no other effect.

Recharge Item (see House Rule: Magical items. Recharging items can now be done with Recharge Item spell.)
Recharge Item (my version of it, anyway. Created on 19 March 2017)
School alteration; Level Bard 3, Cleric 4, Druid 4, Sorcerer 4, Wizard 4.
Casting Time 1 standard action
Components V, S, M (item to be recharged)
Range touch
Target living creature touched
Duration 10 minutes
Saving Throw none; Spell Resistance no

You can cast this spell upon yourself or another living spellcaster in order to recharge a magic item. When this spell is cast, a glowing aura appears around the item. The spell recipient must know the spell(s) required to recharge the item (a Sorcerer must know Magic Missile in order to recharge a Wand of Magic Missiles). Items that do not have specific spells, such as a Ring of Shooting Stars, may have special spell requirements (DMs approval). The spell recipient may then begin casting their spells into the aura with the sole intent of recharging the item. Casting any spells upon the item in question without this intent results in the spell having its normal effect (and no charges are restored into the item).
The spells cast upon the item recharge a number of charges equal to the level of the spell (a Wizard's Fireball spell restores 3 charges).
Recharge Item cannot be made permanent with a permanency spell.

Spark (cantrip)
School evocation [fire]; Level bard 0, cleric 0, druid 0, sorcerer/wizard 0,
Elemental School fire 0
Casting Time 1 standard action
Components V or S
Range close (25 ft. + 5 ft./2 levels)
Targets one Fine object
Duration instantaneous
Saving Throw Fortitude negates (object); Spell Resistance yes (object)
You can make an unattended Fine flammable object catch on fire. This works as if you were using flint and steel except that you can use spark in any sort of weather and it takes much less time to actually ignite an object.

DISALLOWED SPELLS
Burning Arc
Reasoning: Too powerful for a 2nd level spell. At 8th level, a caster can dish out 14d6 damage (save vs. Reflex for half) across multiple targets using only a 2nd level spell slot? No thanks. (This was decided when making Wolf's character in our Conversation thread on page 11.)

Elemental Assessor
Reasoning: Too powerful against creatures who take double damage against a particular element (a thing almost no PC has to worry about for their own character).

Say this was cast on a Frost Giant. No caster is likely to miss such a target with a ranged touch attack (few enemies have a decent defense against ranged touch attacks). So, the Frost Giant takes a total of 6d6 damage from the various elements except for fire from which the giant takes 4d6. Then, for an average of 2.5 rounds, the same giant takes another 20d6 in fire damage (4d6 x 2) x 2.5 rounds. That means this single damage-over-time spell inflicts a massive 30d6 damage upon which the giant does not receive a saving throw.

Also, this spell takes away all of the guesswork (hence "assessor") from opponents that may have such vulnerabilities. They would easily figure out that the target of the spell is susceptible toward a certain element(s) no matter how well-hidden. No thank you.

Elemental Assessor
School evocation [acid, cold, electricity, fire]; Level cleric/oracle 6, sorcerer/wizard 6

[paste:font size="3"]standard action
Components V, S, M/DF (four needles)
Range: Cose (25 feet +5ft/2 levels)
[paste:font size="3"]elemental ray
Duration 1d4+1 rounds (see text)
Saving Throw none; Spell Resistance yes

[paste:font size="3"]Azata champions developed this spell to deal with fiends with unknown resistances. A ray of spiraling colors springs from your hand and streaks to its target.

You must make a successful ranged touch attack to hit your target with the ray, which deals 2d6 points of acid damage, 2d6 points of cold damage, 2d6 points of electricity damage, and 2d6 points of fire damage.

The type of energy that does the most points of damage to the target then persists, dealing another 4d6 points of that type of damage per round for 1d4 rounds.

Form of the Dragon (any). Found in a Conversation Cap'n and I had on 30 May 2015 (entitled Roundabout!).

Geas/Quest (from the Core book).
Reasoning: But as for Geas/Quest, I don't want it in our game. I have never liked a spell or effect that basically says, "Do exactly as I say, no save, or suffer horribly and perhaps die." It's one thing to have a death effect hit a character. O.K. Boom, either you live or you die. But to have a spell that instantly kind of turns your character into someone's slave? How much fun is that to RP? "Sorry guys, but my character can't go on this fun and exciting adventure with you, because Wizard Dirtbag the Daring has Geased me into mopping his floors!" Adventurers' Table post.

Snowball
Reasoning: Too powerful for a 1st level spell. I think 5d6 damage (avg. 17.5) plus a possible stagger is too much for a 1st level spell, when compared to Magic Missile which unerring, does 3d4+3 (avg. 10.5) with no condition at the same level).

Stunning Barrier
Reasoning Too powerful for a 1st level spell. It requires a melee attacker to make a Will save or be stunned. When stunned, one drops anything in-hand, effectively taking out a melee attacker for 2 rounds per casting not to mention a stun's other effects).

CHANGES TO ALLOWED SPELLS

Cure Wounds (and Mass Cure Wounds)
Cure Wounds spells have changed. All four levels of Cure Wounds spells have been condensed into one spell. Therefore, when a PC selects the Cure Wounds spell, they can announce which level of that spell they are casting and roll dice accordingly.

Example: A 4th level Bard can either Cure Wounds at 1st level spell ability (healing 1d8 hit points +1/level to a maximum of 5 at the cost of a 1st level spell slot) or Cure Wounds at 2nd level spell ability (healing 2d8 hit points +1/level to a maximum of 10 at the cost of a 2nd level spell slot) all the way up to 4th level spell ability. This requires only one Spell Known from the Bard instead of four.

Dimension Door
On the other hand, we've changed up Dimension Door so that it still kind of works the way it did in 1st Edition. In this case, the caster makes a magical portal and the rest of the party boogies on through. The caster is the last one through. Oh, and yes, if you are unlucky enough to Dimension Door you and your party into a solid object, there still is a chance you might wind up on another completely random plane of existence! It's happened in Sharseya, and boy, did we have a good time with it. =) Adventurers' Table Post.

Enhance Ability (see New Spells above)

Haste
Re: Haste spell. After seeing Pathfinder's Haste in action for the first time, I am going to make an improvement to the spell as follows: Currently, Haste reads: "When making a full attack action, a hasted creature may make one extra attack with one natural or manufactured weapon." I am changing this to a standard action instead (which I did for both Bren and Powerpaw in their last turns). Reasoning: One of the aspects I really liked about D&D 3.5's Haste spell was the ability to both move your movement rate and still let off a full-attack action. In other words, while I like the wording Pathfinder uses, I don't like the nerf and I'm changing it (and if I'm missing something and it turns out to be too much, I'll revert it back). As this is an improvement, I don't think any of you will mind? Do you? Adventurers' Table Post.

Mass Cure Wounds (see Cure Wounds above)

Mirror Image
Per a conversation in
1. The spell has no effect on those who cannot see it (including those, say, in a pitch-black room).
2. If the caster is invisible, the spell has no effect and is wasted if cast.

Summon Monster (all)
(Written for this post in reference to Adventurers' Table, pg 106, Entry #2633)
The Summon Monster spells can be just plain fun. There is something special about requesting a fantastic creature from a far off plane of existence to come to fight on your behalf.

Here's how it works:

- Your character casts the spell. I provide you a list of what is available. This is usually the list straight from the Paizo website (but not always). I'll add notes if, say, certain creatures are not available. A good example is a Celestial Dolphin on dry land...
- You select the creature you want.
- You tell me where you want to place the summoned creature on the battle map (if in combat. More on this below).
- That creature acts immediately on its own accord using methods it is comfortable with. You can request the creature perform certain attack methods or tactics provided you communicate this with the summoned creature and it agrees. You do not have to direct the creature if you don't want to; many summoned extraplanar creatures are intelligent and capable without requiring outside supervision. Some aren't, though. Be careful with these.

Furthermore...
- In my game, you may attempt to summon the same creature over and over again. The creature will remember you and possibly get to know you. After many such occasions, you might eventually create a relationship (or reputation) with that creature. Doing so eventually might make summoning said creature easier in the future (it may appear in places such creatures are not normally found, like a Summoned Dire Badger in a desert).
- It is important to understand that a summoned creature does not have to appear if it doesn't want to. Let's say you wronged the last Angel you summoned. It knows this. It has a life when you're not around. Who is to say it hasn't talked to its buddies about you? Just remember what you summon can always say "no, thanks."
- Summoned creatures (especially Celestial) are often not afraid of defeat as it is not final death for that creature. Still, being defeated or dispelled is not a pleasurable experience and such creatures will attempt victory with what time they have with you; the definition of victory may vary from creature to creature.
- Summoned creatures tend to have their own personalities, life experiences, areas of knowledge, and realms of expertise (or lack thereof in the case of many dinosaurs). As such, they might be summoned outside of combat and (politely) questioned. For example, a high-level caster who needs to travel to the Elemental Plane of Fire for the first time might summon a Large Fire elemental and ask it questions about that plane of existence and how one survives there.
- Keep in mind that summoned creatures will act in accordance with their intelligence, alignment, and background. A summoned dinosaur is still very much a dinosaur and might not possess intelligence beyond that of a normal dinosaur. Then again... it might... =)

Unseen Servant
The Unseen Servant does its best to please, but it is far from suicidal (I say this as a general warning, not intended toward any Wanderer players here; there are players out there who think the spell solely exists for the creature to fling itself on the proverbial grenade, if you know what I mean. The Servant is helpful, but it isn't stupid). Just saying. Adventurers' Table Post.

CORE RACE CHANGES
Elves and Half-Elves
Elves and Charm spells. For what must be at least 30 years, full-blooded Elves enjoyed a 90% resistance to both Sleep and Charm effects (while Half-elves enjoyed 30%). These resistances were rolled first, and if they were not effective, the character still received a saving throw (if applicable).

At some point in Sharseya, for the sake of simplicity, I just gave Elves complete immunity to both Sleep and Charm and gave Half-Elves a +2 bonus vs. enchantment effects. I have updated Shop Talk to reflect these changes.

CORE CLASS CHANGES
ALL SPELLCASTERS
1. Spellcasters of all types can now recover their spells once a day. This effectively resets their spells for the day. Study/pray/meditation time has been decreased from 1 hour to 10 minutes. A short rest of about 15 minutes must come between study/meditation/prayers.

Example: The party, after having prepared their spells for the day, is now in need of spell restoration. They must first rest for 15 minutes minimum (call it catching your breath, getting a small meal, etc.) and then they may study/pray/meditate a second time for that day for a minimum of 10 minutes. Success restores their daily spells per day. They cannot recover their spells a third time that day (they must wait for the next day per normal Pathfinder rules).

2. In special circumstances, all spellcasters may now use a higher-level spell to cast a lower-level spell. A caster who does not want to use 3rd level spell slots (or is out of them) may instead use a 4th level spell slot to cast that 3rd level spell.

Example: For some awful reason, the party Wizard has to keep casting Magic Missile to keep her party alive. She has, however, run out of 1st level spells. The spellcaster may substitute (sacrifice?) any higher level spell to cast Magic Missile yet again. This can be done until the caster is out of spells for the day. Only higher-level spells may be substituted for lower, not the other way around.

Druid and Ranger
Both Druids and High-level Rangers may cast Create Food and Water as the 3rd level Clerical spell of the same name (Druids and Rangers at 3rd level spell ability).

Paladin
1. All Paladins start with a code of conduct befitting their chosen deity. Your DM will help you with this.To benefit the players, the Code of Conduct for Paladins of Mielikki is stated here:
Respect legitimate authority
Act with honor
Do not use poison
Defend the forest and all that rightfully call it home
Nurture the forest with word and deed
Aid the innocent but do not interfere with a fair hunt
Provide for the needy

A Mielikkian prayer:
Mielikki, Lady of the Forest,
wife of the vast woods,
walk through all the wilderness,
search the far backwoods
Lead the squirrel,
make it run, make it fly
to the path of the seeking man
to the steps of this hunting hero
Lead the squirrel,
lay it on the branch of fortune.

2. Paladins have proficiency with Tower Shields starting at 1st level.

3. At 3rd level, Paladins may choose either from the Mercy ability or gain a permanent Protection from Evil 10' radius upon their person. Once this decision is made, it cannot be changed.

This protective radius can be dispelled for 1 round by the use of Dispel Magic or paused indefinitely if inside an Anti-Magic Shell or the like. The protection also does not function if the paladin is unconscious or dead, however it does remain in effect when the paladin is sleeping/trancing normally (not under the influence of a Sleep or similar spell).

The protection has all of the abilities and limitations as the Protection from Evil spell and as long as part of a creature is inside the radius, all of the creature is thus protected (say, a mount that takes up two five-foot squares is only in 'halfway,' the field protects as long as part of that creature remains inside the protective field. Of course, the protection follows the paladin).

Rogue
Improved Sneak Attack - a rogue in melee combat no longer needs to be flanking opposite an ally to use Sneak Attack, but may instead be in any other square adjacent to the target as long as that target has its attention on a target other than the rogue (in MMORPG terms, the Rogue must not have "aggro" of any kind). A target directly attacking the rogue is not considered reasonably distracted and therefore is not subject to Sneak Attack.

ALLOWED STARTING CLASSES
Favored Soul (Miniatures Handbook, pg 6)
Healer (completely reworked! Now called Healer 2.0 as of October 2017 with elements DM-provided Sharseyan modifications and Miniatures Handbook, pg 8)
Marshal (Miniatures Handbook, pg 12)
Warmage (Miniatures Handbook, pg 16 minus the new Miniatures Handbook Arcane spells).


ALLOWED PRESTIGE CLASSES
Arcane Archer (Core Book pg 374)
Arcane Trickster (Core Book pg 376)
Assassin (Core Book pg 378)
Deepwood Sniper (from D&D 3.5)
Duelist (Core Book pg 382)
Eldritch Knight (Core Book 384)
Havoc Mage (Miniatures Handbook, pg 20)
Loremaster (Core Book 385)
Mystic Theurge (Core Book 387)
Pathfinder Chronicler (Core Book 388)
Shadowdancer (Core Book 391, Kaerri =) )
Skullclan Hunter (Miniatures Handbook, pg 21)
Tactical Soldier (Miniatures Handbook, pg 22)

DISALLOWED PRESTIGE CLASSES
Bonded Summoner (Miniatures Handbook, pg 16)
Dragon Disciple (Conversation with Cap'n called "Roundabout!". Core Book pg 380)
Dragon Samurai (Miniatures Handbook, pg 18)
Team-killing F*cktard. (Adventurers' Table Post).
War Hulk (Miniatures Handbook, pg 23)
Warchief (Miniatures Handbook, pg 24)[/spoiler]
 
Last edited:

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
#3
*Reserving this post just in case I someday run out of room with the one above it. Thanks for the great idea, Kaerri. =) *
 

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