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Westward ("Earthsea" meets "Moana")

Dice System
Pathfinder

FathersDislikeMe

Don't Forget to Kill Tim
OOC [This is only an interest check. If it garners enough interest, I will open recruitment and finish up the wiki. The wiki will have more in-depth setting information and the alternate rules for “primal magic.”]


Westward: A Story Beyond the Horizon


The archipelago of Kei’Olu has existed independent of foreign influence for time immemorial. Even before the first Songs of the nation’s people, the lianu have turned away travelers and would-be invaders.

After centuries of isolation, however, visitors from the Long Lands to the west have landed on the northern island of Daurim. Tribal scouts have told of the settlement they have built, their ships large enough to hold an entire village, and how their skin ranges in shade from obsidian black to pale as the froth of a wave. All of them hold weapons of metal, and some even wear metal clothing!

Most of the Oluah – the people of the Kei’Olu nation – have never even seen an outlander. The only natives to have interacted with the Long Landers are the
Wuadakem – or “wordpainters” – a conclave of mystics dedicated to recording knowledge and developing the first written script of the Oluah. Keth, wise among the wordpainters, has spoken to the eight tribes of the southern islands. A great tribal congress was called.

Some of the tribes called for war to drive back the invaders. Some called for seclusion. It was Chief Wei Motu, however, renowned for leading a force of warriors against the
kuru, who decided that the Wuadakem should go and teach the Long Landers the customs of the Oluah. Perhaps to gauge the foreigners' intent, as well.

To protect the Wuadakem ambassadors, it was suggested that a band of
olunos – those blessed with the gifts of the divine spirits – accompany the wordpainters on their journey (to the chagrin of Chief Rokkmu Wotaw, Motu's bitter rival). Motu has called for a trial to be held at the tribal capitol of Wanu Lem, and each of the eight tribes have volunteered one oluno – no more than twenty cycles of age, without mate or child – from their tribe to compete.

Those found worthy in the eyes of the chieftains shall attend the
Wuadakem on their journey to meet with the visitors from the Long Lands.

The Game

Each character will be a representative of one of the eight tribes asked to participate in the trial. I have only designed three tribes:

The Tribes of Kei’Olu The Nawei tribe lead by Chief Wei Motu, known for their honor, perseverance, and intense personalities. Their totem is a laughing giant. Their patron spirits are Jei Jua Joa (Ascending) and Boka-Loai (Active).

The Rokkmu tribe lead by Chief Rokkmu Wotaw, known for their hunting prowess, their clever tongues, and their secretive ways learned in the darkest jungles of Kei’Olu. Their totem is a two-headed jaguar. Their patron spirits are Ssekli (Hidden) and Boka-Louai (Dormant).

The Ail’ne tribe lead by Chief Leida Janu, known for their boat making, their ocean hunts, and their stalwart passion for travel and exploration. Their totem is a dolphin. Their patron spirits are Jei Jua Joa (Flying) and Gresta (Attacking).


Players may choose one of the these tribes, or create their own. (I could really use some help designing the ferik tribe, as I literally can't even with catfolk.)

Characters will begin competing in the trial at the capitol and, from there, accompany Keth and his Wuadakem on their travel north to Daurim. From there, they will have to make a difficult choice: stay and protect their home, or do the unthinkable - leave Kei'Olu and travel to the Long Lands.

GAMEPLAY & SETTING THEMES

Themes

  • High Fantasy in a Tropical Tribal Culture: Culture is based on a mishmash of idealized aspects of Hawaiin, Maori, Mayan, and Okinawan historical cultures - a very poor understanding of said cultures. And yes, if it's important, the Oluah people are not based on white European ethnicities. Earthsea, baby!
  • International Diplomacy: Much of the game will revolve around the Oluah player characters interacting with different cultures with far different ideas. The Oluah have a very "live and let live" policy, whereas the "civilized" people have a "you have what I want so I'll take it" mindset.
  • Triumph of Mortal Spirit: The people of Kei'Olu are loathe to give up. They will often fight for what they believe in when others have given up. Their weapons are not just what they hold in their hand. They have cleverness, reason, and passion on their side.
  • Barbarism & Savagery: Though islanders are considered "savages" (even among the most open-minded), there is plenty of savagery among the civilized cities of the Long Lands. The "noble savage" versus the "savage noble."
  • Love in a Loveless Land: I specifically designed the Oluah to have seven words for "love" in their language to explore the concept of romance and sexuality. If the characters choose to explore the Long Lands, they may be shocked to find how little love there is. A world of forced prostitution, prejudice against homosexuality, arranged marriages, and constant infidelity would seem alien to them.
  • Exploration & High Adventure: It is, after all, a game. There will be sights to see, goods to loot, and a fair amount of swashbuckling. So buckle your swashes. I also love to add large amounts of athletic challenges (chase scenes and the like) and diplomatic challenges with very high stakes. Words can be just as sharp as swords, after all.



Setting

”Here the sun breaks on the sea
Beads of sunlight rolling past
So far from tribe and shre
But never have I felt so near
So near, to the crashing waves
So near, to the tribal fire
So near, to Ola’s embrace
I feel so near.”


Oluah Prayer Song (translated to Andiran)

CULTURE

Though a tribal society barely emerging from an era of Neolithic technology, the Oluah people are far from ignorant savages. In truth, many would find them more socially advanced than most “civilized” nations. Their Songs – a form of oral history – detail their in depth laws governing behavior, civil matters, and tribal conflict. They even have members of their tribe who function as lawyers and judges.

They enjoy riddles and intricate, language-centric comedy. Many Oluah have jokes specific to their tribes (an archaic form of “memes”, if you will). Buffoonery and puns are considered the humor of children, not adults.

Though the Wuadakem have yet to create a written language, oral history Songs are aided by weavings and paintings denoting important events in their nation’s past.

Their “gods” – the divine spirits – extol virtues of innovation and personal accomplishment along with honoring one’s family, one’s tribe, and one’s self. Elders are encouraged to teach the young not to believe as they do, but to be wise when they become mature enough to make their own decisions.

Hygiene is tied to spiritual wellbeing, and few Oluah suffer from illness or infection.

COURTSHIP & ROMANCE

Romance among the Oluah is complex, sacred, and far more chaste than in most of the Long Lands (especially among the amorous Andirans). Calling a woman “beautiful” or a man “handsome” is an admission of feeling, not just a fleeting compliment. The word “modesty” takes on a different meaning in Kei’Olu, as it refers to words and actions and less to dress. As Kei’Olu is a tropical land, clothing is light, breathable, loose, and generally less is considered more.

Among the Rajanmen and Andirans, a woman with exposed shoulders and a man with a shirt partially fastened is considered enticing. Among the Kei’Olu, it’s just the norm. Most of the men don’t even wear shirts unless for protection or on cool nights.

Courtship is a slow process that can begin as early as childhood. Women and men both show their intended affection by performing feats of personal accomplishment (hunting dangerous prey, feats of athletic skill, composing original songs, etc.) and kindness towards the others friend and family.

The Oluah believe that romantic relationships are sacred, and though tribal nobility may desire to arrange mateships between favored sons or daughters, if there is no love between a pair, the relationship is simply seen as “not meant to be.”

The Oluah have seven words for “love.” Three refer to non-romantic love, and four refer to different levels of romantic love: childhood love (a charming but passing fancy), love between two women, love between two men, and love between a male and female mate. Each love is seen as equally important and sacred.

Polygamy is not unheard of in Kei’Olu, but is more a social construct than polyamory. If a mate is suffering, has lost his or her mate, or has lost his or her mate and suffers from a condition that makes them unfit to survive alone, they may be taken into the home of a mated pair. Leeda Janu, the chieftain of the Ail’ne tribe, has three husbands.

Though this may seem idyllic, there is still prejudice and violence among the Oluah. Children born of lust rather than love are forced to live on tribal outskirts, are any children born with kuru features. Violence is justified by law if an offender greatly insults another’s family, harms another’s family or friends, or in cases of infidelity. Though uncommon, a number of Oluah have died in single combat against a jilted mate.



TECHNOLOGY

”Long had I traveled over frothy wave
Song and gold and drink I crave.
But in the port of the Rajanmen
I found not gold nor drink nor friend.

“I walked the market as I was told
To where slave flesh was bought and sold
And saw a girl no chains could tame
Who spat and hissed at all who came.”

“Her hair was dark, her eyes were blue
They called her the savage from Kei’Olu.
Her vicious defiance was legend, no lie!
(And my eyes, they strayed to copper thighs.)

“So, a fellow, what was I to do?
I purchased the girl from Kei’Olu.
She bit me twice on my nose, square
This bestial beauty with long, dark hair.

“I lead her along to the pier
And she bit me thrice, on my left ear!
I levied gold for passage by oar
To take her back to her home shore.

“I sent her off over ocean blue
The dark-haired girl from Kei’Olu.”


The Girl from Kei’Olu (sea shanty composed by Captain Caiden Scapolle, Sea Marshal of Witchport)



The technology of the Oluah people is simple. Most weapons are made of wood, hide, jade, stone, bone, shark teeth, and obsidian. Armor is cloth and hide sometimes braced with wooden or bone splints. They have no concept of fuel or smelting ore, though they do often use hammered gold and rough gems to ornament their attire.

Artistically, the Oluah favor stark, geometric patterns and their architecture, though simple, is sound and solid. They rarely use stone for building, but when they do, their structures weather centuries of salt winds and rain storms.

Oluah fabric - woven from mixtures of plant fiber, domestic animal fur, and hide strips – is sturdy, breathable, and remarkably comfortable. It is considered the most supple material in the Middle Sea. Many a merchant or noble who has had the chance to feel Oluah fabric begs to learn where they can get more.



RELIGION

“I had heard only rumors of Kei’Olu’s existence, and how it was guarded by a long island of fierce giants. As such, when the captain suggested we take a northern current to avoid the archipelago, I agreed.

“We harbored near a small island where a band of tribal explorers had a camp. Not to alarm them, I set out alone each evening on a canoe and played the lyra on the shore in plain view. On the third evening, a young woman joined me and played songs I had never heard on a jade whistle.

"She spoke Rajanish, learned from her time as a Rajan slave, and I invited her on board. She saw the plaque in my cabin bearing the crown and rod of Kahlhaim. She asked what it was, and I told her that it was a symbol of my god. When she asked why my god did not travel with me, I told her it was because he lived in a court of spirits far from the mortal realms.

“Her eyes heavy with sympathy, she touched the back of my hand and said, ’It must be frightening and lonely to have a god who does not live among your people. I am sure he will return soon.’”


A Passage from Middle Sea Histories of the Bard Laureate of Solm, by Tomas the White

The Oluah do not so much worship as pay homage to their divine spirits. The divine spirits are terrestrial, and a number of Oluah have told stories of meeting one of their avatars or the spirits itself. The handful of foreigners who have ever visited Kei’Olu find it odd that the Oluah speak to religious symbols as though they are the gods themselves.

The Oluah find it odd that Long Landers worship small statues.

Though the divine spirits are not completely benign nor completely malevolent, they can be apathetic when the mood strikes them. The primary divine spirit of the Oluah is Oluai. The Song of Beginning (which is quite similar to other creation stories, specifically in Andiran mythology, Rajan history, and the United Church of Gazria) tells the story of how, before the time of the mortal races, a titan of earth and fire had a dream of the mortal races. The gods begged the titan to give them his dream so that they could guide the mortals, but the titan refused and kept the dream in his sleep.

Ancevmai, a dark god of secrets and trickery, snuck into the titan’s dreams and stole the mortals from it, dividing them among the gods. Oluai, seeing the decadence of the other gods, took his part of the dream to the islands of Kei’Olu, and set the Oluah people upon the shore.

To better guide and protect his people, Oluai broke himself into three parts: Olu (the father), Ola (the mother), and Oli (the spirit wind). He gifted the divine spirits with a portion of his will and tasked them with guiding the people.

The Seven Divine Spirits of the Oluah

Ssekli, the “Snake Father” – also called “Papa Snake”, “Grandfather Shadow”, and “Hidden Sting” – is a mysterious and dark spirit. Most members of the Rokkmu tribe pay homage to Ssekli, especially Chief Wotaw, the “Scarred Snake.” Rumors say that the spirit that corrupted the kuru was Ssekli in disguise.

His symbol is a two-headed serpent bearing a branch of nightshade in one mouth. His aspects are Hidden (secrets, stealth, introspection), Hunting (silence, ambush, manipulation), and Searching (exploration, hidden truths).

Gresta, the “Great Huntress” – also called “Sister Shark”, “Many Teeth Gresta”, and “Crone” – is the spirit of hunting, the ocean, and predation.

Her symbol is a sharks jaw filled with red teeth holding a fishing spear. Her aspects are Sated (rest, healing, calm), Swimming searching, moving forward, remaining stalwart), and Attacking (fierceness, fearlessness, focus).

Boka-Loai, “Grandfather Volcano” – also called “The Riddle Maker” and “Wise Boka” – is the spirit of wisdom, of finding truths hidden deep within the earth, knowledge, and discerning lies.

His symbol is a mountain with a fire at its center. His aspects are Dormant (calm, secretive, studious), Active (learning, active wisdom, searching for truth), and Erupting (attacking, passion, force).

Jei Jua Joa, “The Far Hawk” – also called “Laughing Joa”, “Sky Hunter”, and “Olu’s Spear” – is the spirit of travel, freedom, and flight. He is often invoked when fishermen and travelers between islands wish for fair weather, and he finds those with a desire to explore truly exceptional. Often, fishermen will throw a piece of flesh from their first catch of the day into the air, as tribute to the Far Hawk.

His symbol is a hawk holding a giant fishing hook and a palm front in its talons. His aspects are Ascending (boldness, resplendence, charisma), Flying (travel, perseverance, staying the course), and Descending (home, family, reflection).

Ailen – “The Maiden” – also called “Fair Ailen”, “The Dancer”, and “The Midwife” – is the spirit of fertility, food, love, hearth, and healing. She is known as passionate and strong when it comes to protecting what is her’s.

Her symbol is a flowering tree. Her aspects are Dancing (innovation, movement, athletics), Singing (healing, teaching, building, joy), and Gathering (caretaking, peacekeeping, sacrifice, fearlessness).


The Three Great Spirits

Olu – The Spirit Father – is the male aspect of the triune Oluai. He is the spirit of protection, war, joy, and competition. His symbol is a wide mouth open and smiling. His aspects are Waking (greeting challenges, moving forward, passion) and Reclining (wisdom, resting, fellowship).

Ola – The Spirit Mother – is the female aspect of the triune Oluai. She is the spirit of growth, nurturing, learning, innovation, calm, and defending. Her symbol is a sun and moon side by side. Her aspects are Waking (harvest, plenty, art, training, archery, spear handling) and Reclining (nurturing, sharing, protecting).

Oli – The Spirit Wind – is the spiritual aspect of the triune Oluai. It is the spirit of movement, messages, and the horizon. It is also the spirit of the future of the Oluah people. Its symbol is three wavy lines symbolizing wind. Its aspects are Blowing (forthrightness, exploration, innovation, striving) and Still (reflection, songs, poetry, and rest).


The Eighth Spirit Though legends of the kuru and their corruption are generally attributed to Ssekli, some say that the kuru and their home in the Shadow Lands were visited by an evil spirit completely alien to Kei’Olu. Some fallen kuru berserkers have used their last breaths to praise a spirit referred to as “The Apart One,” “The Black Father”, and “Servant of Eragoth.”

MAGIC

”Magic? I love magic! It has always fascinated me. And to address the rumors that my success is due to sorcery, I assure you all that the only magic I use is my silver tongue and disarming smile.”

Cyrus “The Baron” Blackshire, Owner of the Western Ainnelmain Trading Company

The Oluah have no concept of arcane or divine magic. The best way to describe their magic would be to call it “primal.” The olunos, or “spirit gifted”, inherit the ability to control and communicate with spiritual energy through the blessing of their patron spirit. Olunos are rare, and even the larger tribes only give birth to a handful of olunos in a generation. The Rokkmu tribe boasts the highest concentration of olunos, and almost all of them inherit the spirit gifts of Ssekli.

Being an oluno is often, but not necessarily, hereditary, with higher rates of oluno children born to mates who are both olunos. Olunos are seen as blessings, and if they pass their initiation and their gift fully awakens, their destiny as tribal ambassadors and protectors is set in stone. Those oluno who do not honor their destiny are seen as betrayers and are called noknoku, which is a derivation of a very foul word in the Oluah language.

Gameplay In the context of gameplay, each character will be a gestalt, with the abilities to use primal magic added to their existing class abilities. Primal magic is a point based magic system, similar to psionics, but is not arcane, divine, or psionic in nature.

Unlike psionics, oluno characters use their points to heavily modify and customize magical effects. Each type of primal magic has four aspects that can be changed with the expenditure of additional points (intensity, area, shape, duration). For example, a character with the Elemental [fire] type of primal magic may spend 5 spirit points to fill a 15’x15’ area with fire that deals 1d6 damage to all within, or spend 5 points to attack a single target with fire that deals 3d6 damage. An illusionist may spend a single point to create a simple illusion that affects touch, sound, or sight, or may spend three points to create a simple illusion that affects all three. By spending additional points, they may also increase the duration of the illusion from “concentration” to “1 minute/1 point.”

Primal magic is not as powerful or fast as sorcery (arcane magic), and primal magic users cannot benefit from metamagic feats, counterspelling options, and cannot use divine or arcane magical items such as scrolls, wands, or any spell-storing item. However, primal magic highly rewards player creativity.

Unlike typical spell-based magic, primal magic is largely narrative and freeform. In my last game, a primal magic user with Wild magic combined their ability to change weather with the Death magic of another character’s entropy ability. They told me they wished to summon a rainstorm with drops of water that decayed any structure they hit. So I allowed it. And it was awesome.



CHARACTER CREATION

”So I arrest this group last night. The barmaid at the tavern across the street saw them sneaking into someone’s house and sent a runner to tell me. So me and the boys head in, put ‘em at sword point, and they tell us they were hired to investigate some guildie rumored to be a cultist. They tell me they’re ‘adventurers’, like it gives them some kind of immunity.

“So I say, ‘hey, I hire adventurers too. They’re called Blackcoats.’ I didn’t cause any lasting damage, but I had my boys rough ‘em up a bit before we tossed ‘em in the stockade.

“Adventurers, they said. What a bunch of characters. Eh, Renny? You know what I’m talking about.”


Constable Gedry Mason, Witchport City Guard

This story is skill-heavy and story-heavy, so I’m not initially too concerned about the fine tuning. Generally, I’m willing to work with my players, favoring fun ideas over rules lawyering. Got an idea? Toss it at me. So long as it isn’t gamebreaking or minmaxing. I do not abide minmaxers.

Character Creation

  • Attributes: 20 point buy
  • Level: 1 [double XP to 5th level]
  • Class: No primary casting classes (wizards, clerics, druids, etc.), secondary casting classes must take no spell variants. Common classes are: fighter, barbarian, ranger, rogue (survivalist, tribal trickster), shifter, voyageur, scout
  • Alternate Rules: Illiteracy [Oluah cannot read (other than tribal hieroglyphs), but this will be fixed in short order], Defense Bonus, Armor as Damage Reduction, Vigor/Wounds, Low Tech Weaponry
  • Races:
Races of Kei’Olu

Humans: Taken as standard human race according to Pathfinder.

Feriks (catfolk): Considered a tribe unto themselves, the feriks are actually a collection of sub-tribes. Though they have peaceful relations with most Oluah humans and are considered to be part of the Oluah nation, their feline aspects (manic energy, curiosity, talkative nature, overbearing physical affection) make them entertaining and annoying in equal measure.

Feriks are incredibly varied, with some looking like bipedal jaguars and ocelots (affecting their speech slightly), and some merely bearing feline-esque ears, eyes, or exotic skin coloring reminiscent of wild cats. [Mechanically taken as standard catfolk.]

Kurutek: Those cursed with kuru blood are called kurutek. Their bestial features cause them to be distrusted, and they are forced to live in exile, on the outskirts of tribal land. The only friendly relations they have (if you can call it “friendly”) are with other outcasts. They typically despise other kurutek. Those that perform legendary feats of heroism to protect a tribe are sometimes welcomed into tribal society.

Kurutek are dim and hidebound, but hearty and surprisingly introspective. They gain the following ability scores: +2 Strength, +2 Wisdom, -2 Int, -2 Charisma. They also gain darkvision, the Toughness feat, and a +2 bonus to Bluff and Diplomacy when dealing with kuru. A kurutek oluno is called a shentari, meaning “shadow mongrel.”

Faerahl: Faerahl are mortals with fey blood lingering in their ancestry. They often appear to be exotic, with mild inhuman features, and possess alien beauty. They are seen by other human tribals as fair neighbors, but many faerahl tend to feel out of touch with pure humans and spend more time in the wild than most.

Faerahl are mechanically identical to the Pathfinder elf, except that they always have the Fleet-Footed and Eternal Grudge [monstrous humanoid] alternate racial traits.




[/spoiler]​
 
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D. Rex

Magic Eight Ball
I really love the feel of your idea, and the tropical island and water based settings are definitely among my favorite. I can't say that I have a lot of experience with pathfinder, little at best, and I know nothing about Earthsea, but I definitely have interest in seeing what comes of tEarthen,

1. Do you have any expectations of players or rules of play or posting requirements?

2. Are the kurutek any beastman that isn't catpeople? Or they more like mutants that have animal parts like tail or claws or scales or fangs?
 

FathersDislikeMe

Don't Forget to Kill Tim
I probably should have clarified a few things. Lol.

I chose Pathfinder over Pathfinder 2E and D&D 5E because the rule system is easy to use if you've ever played any d20 game, much less complicated and complex than D& 3.5, and you can learn everything you need to play it in about fifteen minutes. Especially since I nixed spellcasting, since magic is the most complicated thing about PF.

If you read just the "Basics & Ability Scores" and "Classes" section, you'll know enough to play. Also, the entire rule system is available online for free legally right here

Learning the primal magic system will be easy-peesy, as it doesn't rely on a bunch of somatic, verbal, material components, provoking attacks of opportunity, counterspelling, choosing spells, metamagic feats, learning spells, etc. All the things that made creating a wizard difficult and kind of annoying went away.

1. Posting I'd like to keep fairly well-paced. I will not be upset if a post isn't multi-paragraph, especially during action sequences. 4-5 a week is what I aim for, but I also understand that not everyone has the ability to set their own schedule, as I do.

If the game picks up pace, I would also not be averse - if possible - to running monthly chat sessions as well, where everyone can post and interact in real time. Of course, only if this is feasible.

2. The kuru are a monstrous humanoid race I stole from the Skull & Shackles adventure path (which I didn't find nearly as entertaining as Kingmaker, and also didn't like because my DM yelled at me for creating a Mwangi character who could not speak common, which was hilarious).

Kuru are corrupted humans with exaggerated, fierce human features, sharp teeth, red or black eyes, and earth or stone colored skin. They are bigger, meaner, and much more violent than humans. A kurutek would essentially be a "tropical half-orc", but if you wanted to give a kurutek some animal-like features, I'd likely let it slide.

This is a kuru:



Oh, and Earthsea is an old series of fantasy novels from the late sixties that broke the mold by being set on an island planet and was not based on European fantasy. My setting is not an island planet, but Kei'Olu is a very large archipelago, and the major countries the game will visit have a sort of eastern Mediterranean/Red Sea feel to them. The only "European" areas are Solm (fantasy Spain) and Gazria (fantasy Balkan Peninsula).
 
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FathersDislikeMe

Don't Forget to Kill Tim
A Guide to the Long Lands:

1.) The Free City of Witchport (cosmopolitan fantasy trade/pirate city)
2.) Stormlord Holds (Andiran Protectorate, basically The Iron Islands, hold the islands)
3.) Andir (fantasy Turkey)
4.) Solm (fantasy Spain)
5.) Rajan (Arabian Niiiiiiiights~)
6.) Gazria (fantasy Balkan Peninsula)
7.) Mulgar (fantasy Germany)
8.) Gaelia (fantasy Ireland & fantasy Wales)
9.) Ula-Thurg, "The Terror Lands" (seriously, never go here or Cthulhu monsters will eat your face)

Not part of the Long Lands:

1.) Kei'Olu <--- Starting Point

And yes. I have used this setting and been designing it for about six years, off and on. I am not so psycho as to have designed this whole fantasy setting in a week.
 

D. Rex

Magic Eight Ball
I probably should have clarified a few things. Lol.

I chose Pathfinder over Pathfinder 2E and D&D 5E because the rule system is easy to use if you've ever played any d20 game, much less complicated and complex than D& 3.5, and you can learn everything you need to play it in about fifteen minutes. Especially since I nixed spellcasting, since magic is the most complicated thing about PF.

If you read just the "Basics & Ability Scores" and "Classes" section, you'll know enough to play. Also, the entire rule system is available online for free legally right here

Learning the primal magic system will be easy-peesy, as it doesn't rely on a bunch of somatic, verbal, material components, provoking attacks of opportunity, counterspelling, choosing spells, metamagic feats, learning spells, etc. All the things that made creating a wizard difficult and kind of annoying went away.

1. Posting I'd like to keep fairly well-paced. I will not be upset if a post isn't multi-paragraph, especially during action sequences. 4-5 a week is what I aim for, but I also understand that not everyone has the ability to set their own schedule, as I do.

If the game picks up pace, I would also not be averse - if possible - to running monthly chat sessions as well, where everyone can post and interact in real time. Of course, only if this is feasible.

2. The kuru are a monstrous humanoid race I stole from the Skull & Shackles adventure path (which I didn't find nearly as entertaining as Kingmaker, and also didn't like because my DM yelled at me for creating a Mwangi character who could not speak common, which was hilarious).

Kuru are corrupted humans with exaggerated, fierce human features, sharp teeth, red or black eyes, and earth or stone colored skin. They are bigger, meaner, and much more violent than humans. A kurutek would essentially be a "tropical half-orc", but if you wanted to give a kurutek some animal-like features, I'd likely let it slide.

This is a kuru:



Oh, and Earthsea is an old series of fantasy novels from the late sixties that broke the mold by being set on an island planet and was not based on European fantasy. My setting is not an island planet, but Kei'Olu is a very large archipelago, and the major countries the game will visit have a sort of eastern Mediterranean/Red Sea feel to them. The only "European" areas are Solm (fantasy Spain) and Gazria (fantasy Balkan Peninsula).
Very interesting! I think I can manage Pathfinder 1 easily enough. With some questions along the way most likely. I'm familiar enough with d20 systems at least.


As for Kuru! That descriptions helps a lot, thinking of them as half orcs. When you said beastial I had though of animal. But of races, are there any fish folk merfolk kind of playable races in the archipelago? Or do you mainly just want to main three you have listed?
 

D. Rex

Magic Eight Ball
As for 4-5 a week, that may be a bit demanding for me personally. So might not be able to fit in. The length is no problem though.
 

FathersDislikeMe

Don't Forget to Kill Tim
Very interesting! I think I can manage Pathfinder 1 easily enough. With some questions along the way most likely. I'm familiar enough with d20 systems at least.


As for Kuru! That descriptions helps a lot, thinking of them as half orcs. When you said beastial I had though of animal. But of races, are there any fish folk merfolk kind of playable races in the archipelago? Or do you mainly just want to main three you have listed?
Having an aquatic character may not be super feasible, considering that I assume the group will eventually want to have some dry land adventures (I don't claim to know where my players will take the game, however - I once had a group derail an entire campaign because they all wanted to build a casino instead of track down an evil cult).

In a pinch, we could probably homebrew a semi-aquatic character, though. Maybe someone "blessed by Gresta" and just change out the bonus feat a human gets for gills and and bonus to swimming.

The only "merfolk" in the setting are the "creepy fish-monster" kind. Lol.
 

D. Rex

Magic Eight Ball
Having an aquatic character may not be super feasible, considering that I assume the group will eventually want to have some dry land adventures (I don't claim to know where my players will take the game, however - I once had a group derail an entire campaign because they all wanted to build a casino instead of track down an evil cult).

In a pinch, we could probably homebrew a semi-aquatic character, though. Maybe someone "blessed by Gresta" and just change out the bonus feat a human gets for gills and and bonus to swimming.

The only "merfolk" in the setting are the "creepy fish-monster" kind. Lol.
Well I'm not against some inconveniences to myself should it make for good fun. Lol I'm a horrible min/maxer anyway. But that said! I'm also selectively lazy and if being of the three main races makes things easier overall, then I'm just as happy.

Then again, a blessed of Gresta could have some fun potential. And hard to have a bad time with creepy fish monsters.

What is you want out of the initial group of player characters?
 

FathersDislikeMe

Don't Forget to Kill Tim
Well I'm not against some inconveniences to myself should it make for good fun. Lol I'm a horrible min/maxer anyway. But that said! I'm also selectively lazy and if being of the three main races makes things easier overall, then I'm just as happy.

Then again, a blessed of Gresta could have some fun potential. And hard to have a bad time with creepy fish monsters.

What is you want out of the initial group of player characters?
I want unique characters with unique and varying personalities who run around my carefully crafted setting and muck up everything. I want players to have fun. :)

Basic adherence to the setting, respect the background, but otherwise whatever. I have enough skill at using d20 systems that I can balance rules to accomodate different ideas. Like your proposed character idea: human, give them the "aquatic" subtype, sacrifice the bonus feat for +8 Swim and the ability to breathe underwater. Flavor text is up to you.

A blessed of Gresta with her magic (Elemental (water, earth), Wild) would make for a cool character. Kind of like an "aquatic druid" almost.
 

D. Rex

Magic Eight Ball
I want unique characters with unique and varying personalities who run around my carefully crafted setting and muck up everything. I want players to have fun. :)

Basic adherence to the setting, respect the background, but otherwise whatever. I have enough skill at using d20 systems that I can balance rules to accomodate different ideas. Like your proposed character idea: human, give them the "aquatic" subtype, sacrifice the bonus feat for +8 Swim and the ability to breathe underwater. Flavor text is up to you.

A blessed of Gresta with her magic (Elemental (water, earth), Wild) would make for a cool character. Kind of like an "aquatic druid" almost.
Unique characters with the purpose of making a mockery of your world? I excel at stuff like that.


And you kind of have me sold on the "aquatic druid" sort of thing. A lot of fun potential there to tap into. I could probably have some fun playing them like a wereshark, if they aren't already essentially a werewshark.
 

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As a 5e DM, this is amazing and you've put so much work into it. SO Interested!!

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Lioness075

Everyone's fighting some battle of their own.
I read "catfolk" and got hyped. LOL

I'm intrigued and have actually written the lore for an entire tropical planet that had beastpeople living on it. I could absolutely help out with that lore if you want.
 

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