What's new

Fat Gandalf's Bar & Lounge (OOC Chat) - Chapter Six

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
D. Rex - Thanks! By "open sandbox," I mean I let my players do pretty much whatever they want there with no big story hanging over their heads. Here in Broadsword, your characters literally have a unique opportunity to change the course of human history. In Sharseya, it's all about whatever the players feel like doing for the most part. =)

Kaerri - Right! An excellent point that I thought about and failed to bring up! It derails the scene I already had laid out for Hercules to rejoin the group. =)
 

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
Well, I just realized - now that I have a Kaerri and D.Rex online at the same time, did the two of you want to discuss how well (if at all) your Valkyrie Test Pilot characters know (or don't know) each other?
 

Kaerri

Dannigan's Lady
Administrator
Supporter
Well, I don't imagine the base is so big that we've never run into each other at all (being in the same line of work, as it were), so I think some level of acquaintance is called for. Do you have a preference, D. Rex?
 

D. Rex

Magic Eight Ball
D. Rex - Thanks! By "open sandbox," I mean I let my players do pretty much whatever they want there with no big story hanging over their heads. Here in Broadsword, your characters literally have a unique opportunity to change the course of human history. In Sharseya, it's all about whatever the players feel like doing for the most part. =)

Kaerri - Right! An excellent point that I thought about and failed to bring up! It derails the scene I already had laid out for Hercules to rejoin the group. =)
A brave GM you are! But sounds like a pretty cool concept over all. Especially when you got players that are good at taking the initiative.

Well, I just realized - now that I have a Kaerri and D.Rex online at the same time, did the two of you want to discuss how well (if at all) your Valkyrie Test Pilot characters know (or don't know) each other?
No. I don't believe I've had the chance to bring it up yet.



Well, I don't imagine the base is so big that we've never run into each other at all (being in the same line of work, as it were), so I think some level of acquaintance is called for. Do you have a preference, D. Rex?
I have no preference, so long you feel its is something fun you can capitalize on.

I think their squadrons might have known each other more than they would have as individuals.

Richard was in the Blue Hare Squadron. Did a bunch of dirty and dangerous work. Gained the nickname Blue Harem, not just do to them taking anything, but their overall crude demeanor. But that part was pretty typical for air jocks.

They did a lot of military field tests. Less about trying new prototypes in controlled environments, and more about testing things under duress of combat or intended use.

Richard, or "Swiss" as was given his tendency to return full of holes, he and his squadron would have been pretty jovial with other squadrons. And with Elli, he'd have problem thrown her a pickup line or passing flirt. Or congratulate her and her squad on a job well done if he heard about it, or tease should the opportunity arise. Probably tried to ask for a date a time or two, though in the sense he was expecting no as an answer and was just having the fun of asking.

However, he recently lost his squad, pending Dannigans approval of events.
 

Kaerri

Dannigan's Lady
Administrator
Supporter
Elinor ("Bruce Leeanne" once people found out about her interest in martial arts, specifically Jeet Kune Do, Bruce Lee's method) didn't have a squad as such; she went more or less straight to test piloting (the controlled environment sort) and hadn't seen any combat prior to the game start. (She has a squad now, of course, but that was formed during gameplay.) She wouldn't be interested in a date, but fairly polite about it, although she'd probably have ignored the flirting if she was on-duty or in the middle of something relating to duty (looking over the manual for a new craft she was about to take up, for instance). Teasing is always welcome though, and she isn't unfriendly, just uninterested in romance. If he had any questions about whatever project was on her mind, or showed any interest in the engineering side of things, she'd be more than happy to talk about it, particularly if he was about to field-test something she'd done earlier flights with.

So perhaps they'd seen each other in passing, maybe had some conversation here and there? They're both Valkyrie pilots, so there'd be some common ground there.
 

D. Rex

Magic Eight Ball
@Kaerri That sounds pretty good to me. And flirts being ignored is pretty much what he is used to. Lol especially given he likes the cheesy pickup lines. And being more talk than action given his job. So would shoot out a line or two then move in to different topic.

I think them seeing each other in passing in relation to pass along user experience would be their most likely avenues of meeting. Firsthand knowledge from a prior pilot would be considered a lit more valuable than what the costs write in the report.

Valkyries definitely a thing in common. But also fishing. So I can see them probably talking about that as well. Also, with them both in Martial arts, happening across in the gym is also likely.
 

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
A brave GM you are! But sounds like a pretty cool concept over all. Especially when you got players that are good at taking the initiative.
Thanks! But I'm just a guy who is very particular about what kind of players I share a table with. Most of the players (all but one) are playing here in Broadsword too (so you know they're cool people!). =)

However, he recently lost his squad, pending Dannigans approval of events.
Yeah, Ricky definitely lost his squadron. I'm just working out some of the finer details to see how well they fit for Broadsword. =)

Looks like we got it sorted out!
I love it when players talk about stuff like this! =)
 

D. Rex

Magic Eight Ball
Thanks! But I'm just a guy who is very particular about what kind of players I share a table with. Most of the players (all but one) are playing here in Broadsword too (so you know they're cool people!). =)



Yeah, Ricky definitely lost his squadron. I'm just working out some of the finer details to see how well they fit for Broadsword. =)



I love it when players talk about stuff like this! =)
That they are! Hopefully I can meet the bar they set.




Aye aye, boss! Let me know if you need any help. Always happy to add my brainpower to solving things.



And I love it too. Character talk and planning is among my favorite rp things.
 

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
Heya Gang! The life outside my computer screen has been very busy. I have a lot I want to post and I'll post it when I can. Hope you're having a good weekend, everybody! =)

Does anyone have any more character feedback or in-game tips for our two newest players?
 

Kaerri

Dannigan's Lady
Administrator
Supporter
Oooh! I finally remembered the thing I wanted to add several posts ago!

See, there's this phrase Dannigan uses on rare occasions: "Your character is in mortal danger." This is the GM's hint to you that if you don't change your present course of action, your character is incredibly unlikely to survive the immediate consequences. Has everyone seen "Indiana Jones and the Raiders of the Lost Ark" and remember the boulder chase at the start? If not, click here (there's no spoilers). See that look on Indy's face at the start? The GM just told him his character's in mortal danger. ^;3^

Note that Sherwood didn't get told this when Mario hopped into Blue World by himself, because that's not in itself inherently dangerous (aside from us being pretty inexperienced there), and at that point the actual danger (of the hostile Cores) was potential rather than immediate. And of course his subsequent actions helped him escape them.
 

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
As usual, Kaerri is right on the money when it comes to knowing me as a Game Master (not to mention husband! =) ).

If I ever tell any of you, "Your Character is in Mortal Danger," it simply means that I don't see how your character is going to survive until the next scene.

Now, maybe you know something that I don't. Perhaps you have a trick up your sleeve that I haven't considered. I sure hope so!

While it is clearly a thing I do that is completely in favor of the PC, there are certain times I cannot help but bring it up because I don't think that the player fully understands their character's situation.

At that point, I hope to have a deep conversation with the PC so that we are both on the same page. I don't like it when characters died, but sometimes it's unavoidable. But if I see it coming, I sure as heck hope to make certain you do too.

Honor and fun,
Dann =)
 

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
Heya Gang! Here are some things in Broadsword I hope to get done this (busy) week:

1. Post! =)

2. Begin Silanon's character's prologue.

3. Begin D. Rex's character's prologue.

4. Introduce Cover Rating rules (or Cover 2.0 if you like the term).

5. Create a Conversation that at least briefly outlines some of Broadsword's NPCs, especially for some of our newer players. I want the NPCs to be more than just text on a page. =)

6. Anything else I may have forgotten. =)
 

Silanon

Two Thousand Club
Sounds awesome - and I meant to say that I like that kind of warning that Kaerri mentioned. Never happened to me, but there's stories out there where someone loses his favorite character because of a small oversight, which certainly sucks. You know, death in rp's should have a purpose, and not happen by accident - so I'll wholeheartedly appreciate the warning right before my self-sacrifice in the name of science.
 

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
Assuming I see in time, good Sil! I don't always. =)

I've probably mentioned this before, but I think it bears repeating - a good Dungeon Master lets the dice kill players or the players kill players. In my experience, characters have died due to accidents and bad things have happened due to bad die rolls and innocent decisions that just went bad. I can go on and on with examples of surprising things that happened both in favor and against the PCs, usually due to dice, but not always. Now, the word "accidents" to me covers a lot of ground. When I use it here, I mean to say that a character bought the farm because they tried something they thought they could get away with and didn't (mostly through no fault of their own).

Here's an example (one I'm certain Kaerri remembers as she was at the table when it happened). In Brendoran's original party, The Light in the Dark, the party had through much trial and hardship discovered the fabled Maul of the Titans. Now, it was a great maul by itself, but it had a true name that once discovered, would unlock its true potential. Well, the party quested and after long last, discovered the true name! Even back in 1st Edition D&D, this damned thing not only hit like a, well, titan, but it was feared every time a bad guy recognized it. You swung, that door flew off its hinges. You smashed, your opponent sometimes flew off his feet. Oh, and when that thing critically hit, it was often over for that opponent, and the party knew it and loved it!

So... The Light and the Dark are fighting this big, badass dracolich that was an army unto itself. During the course of the battle, the Fighter (who greatly favored his Throw Anything feat) reared back with both of his mighty hands and hurled the Maul of the Titans at the dracolich. The dracolich felt the maul's power as it struck it, looked down and saw the maul lying beside it...

... and what would you do in its position?

That's right! The dracolich promptly picked up the party's favorite weapon and began cleaning house with it! If memory serves, two PCs died in that fight and the party for the first time that I remember was routed! I don't mean "tactically withdrawing" but run for your lives - routed! The players around our table were just blown away, but the whole scene had made its own sort of sense. After the PCs were resurrected (costly!!), I'm glad to say The Light in the Dark went back for round 2 and with a lot more preparation, destroyed that particular dracolich!

But yeah. A player had made a decision he thought was right and it changed everything. I think after the second PC died, I used that old saying of mine, "Your characters are in mortal danger." (Kaerri, do you remember?) I just could not see how the party was going to survive the fight and I didn't feel bad telling them so. By that point, they were coming quickly to the same conclusion.

So yeah. There it is. Accidents kill in my game sometimes (and again, this has happened in the party's favor too!). It's tough, but it's fair, and so I keep doing things the way I do! =)
 

Kaerri

Dannigan's Lady
Administrator
Supporter
For the record, I was not said fighter. I was one of the ones that died, though. I think poor Bren has died two or three times now?
 

Silanon

Two Thousand Club
Great story, my friend - sounds like the kind of gaming session that'll be remembered for quite a while. I'm not sure if I'd call this scene an accident, personally; at least not in the way I meant it when I wrote my post earlier. Then again, it's probably hard to find the sweet spot where I'd try to make the difference. You know, I'm all for deaths if they tell a good story, but I dislike them if there's either nothing to be done at all (like: you rolled a one, I guess you're dead), or when the player messes up where the character wouldn't.

I still remember a Cthulhu session that I saw a long time ago - the player characters had messed up their research, and thus were pretty much unprepared to face their final opponent. You know, there was that one character who'd lost his memory, and the game was basically built for him to regain enough memories in a limited amount of time; depending on how well they'd done, a roll decided on which side he'd fight in the end. Luck and preparation turned against them, and so they all died, one by one - but all of them died in a way that they had other choices, but did what was simply right for the character. That felt like a really well-done end, and it has probably greatly influenced my expectations on how a character death should look like; you know, a death should tell a story, and embarassing ends due to oversight don't always deliver on that.

Just out of curiosity: How often was the fighter reminded of his heroic deed during the following sessions? I'd imagine that's something that sticks with you for years, at least...
 

Kaerri

Dannigan's Lady
Administrator
Supporter
Just out of curiosity: How often was the fighter reminded of his heroic deed during the following sessions? I'd imagine that's something that sticks with you for years, at least...
Oh, we still haul it out from time to time and "throw" it at him. ^;3^

We mostly try to avoid death in Dann's games (and he's not out to get us, either, as he says), so when it does happen, it's almost always because of a bad run of die rolls (not usually a single one) or because of foolish player actions. For example, in the same game as the dracolich fight, but rather earlier, we were going through a dungeon, and a couple of the PCs chose to leave the rest of the party behind and go to a completely separate part of the dungeon -- where they ran into some monsters designed for the whole party, not just two. Meanwhile the rest of us not only couldn't hear them in-character, but were also engaged in combat ourselves and couldn't break away to help them. The two died (I think it was a beholder?) and later one was raised, and the other player chose to leave his sorcerer dead and start new. But they didn't run off by themselves again!

Of course in a game like Broadsword it's a different because we don't have raise dead spells. Magic can be so handy!
 

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
For the record, I was not said fighter. I was one of the ones that died, though. I think poor Bren has died two or three times now?
Twice! Once in the Gaunth fight and the time he and Shalin died at the Deck of Many Things! =) And sorry - I didn't even think that could imply it was Bren who was the Fighter! Hah! =)
 

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
Just out of curiosity: How often was the fighter reminded of his heroic deed during the following sessions? I'd imagine that's something that sticks with you for years, at least...
Oh, when it happened? The PC reminded himself daily it seems. He was greatly embarrassed about it (to the point he considered leaving our table out of his own shame), but... Real Life Always Comes First. This is a game and I reminded him of that. To take away all the years of fun we had, were having, and were to have over a mistake was an even bigger mistake - or so I told him. And so he decided to remain. The rest of the table talked about not throwing the Maul of the Titans at anything (it was and is considered a "party item" not belonging to any one character) and he deeply agreed and never did again! The teasing was always friendly. He just threw other things at his opponents - like... other opponents. They didn't like that so much! =)
 

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
The two died (I think it was a beholder?) and later one was raised, and the other player chose to leave his sorcerer dead and start new. But they didn't run off by themselves again!
A group of trolls (that the two thought they could handle and were probably right) backed after their fight had started by the leader of the trolls, a Beholder (who had been waiting in the shadows for the right time to strike). I remember everyone at the table telling the two (chaotic-aligned PCs) repeatedly not to split the party up, but they had to have it their way!
 

Dannigan

Kaerri's Man. =)
Supporter
Heya Gang! Here are some things in Broadsword I hope to get done this (busy) week:

1. Post! =)

2. Begin Silanon's character's prologue.

3. Begin D. Rex's character's prologue.

4. Introduce Cover Rating rules (or Cover 2.0 if you like the term).

5. Create a Conversation that at least briefly outlines some of Broadsword's NPCs, especially for some of our newer players. I want the NPCs to be more than just text on a page. =)

Heya Gang! @Kaerri @Sherwood @Captain Hesperus @Psychie @Silanon @D. Rex

I'd like your input concerning my introducing Cover Rating rules during ranged combat into Broadsword's Shop Talk. Why cover? I think it adds another level of immersion, fun, and tactics without going into all-out realism. I also like cover because it's handy in Real Life and it's a little more exciting than "anything I roll on a 5 or higher has a chance of hitting, especially if it can't defend itself." Military and paramilitary folks use cover all the time, so I figure, why not try it here? My earlier players might remember that I tried this out during the Beastmaster battle on the Zeki-Zentraedi Assault Scout (and I think it worked O.K. there, but this is a different idea).

So I'd like to know - what do you think of this purely optional House Rule?

Here's how Cover Rating works. Similar to Armor Rating, Cover Rating adds to the Strike total needed to hit the target (in D&D/Pathfinder - think of Cover Rating as Armor Class or Difficulty Class). The bonus from Cover Rating is added to the number 5 (since Strikes of 1-4 on a natural roll automatically do no damage). Therefore, no cover means a 5 or higher is needed to Strike, but Light Cover brings that 5 up to an 8. Medium Cover makes that 5 climb to an 11, and Heavy Cover requires a Strike total of 14 or higher just to hit the target. Indirect weapons that are lobbed (grenades, mortars, but not missiles) take a lighter penalty to Strike (Cover Ratings against them are Light Cover - Strike of 6 or higher), Medium Cover - 7, Heavy Cover - 8). The target in Cover can still defend as normal, but they suffer in Strike rolls when they fire from behind cover. Again, this isn't based on realism; it's just a mechanic I hope is fun and fair for all.

1. GM determines if the battlefield has cover and if so, what kind, how much, and where it is.

2. Players request to use cover (simply by asking). GM describes cover opportunities.

3. Cover is provided in the 4 following types:
3a. Light Cover - Strike of 8 or higher required to hit you; you have no penalty to Strike.
3b. Medium Cover - Strike of 11 or higher required to hit you; you have a -2 penalty to Strike
3c. Heavy Cover - Strike of 14 or higher required to hit you; you have a -4 penalty to Strike
3d. Total Cover - Character cannot be seen nor do they have line-of-sight on any opponents. The character can still lob a grenade blindly or the like (using those rules).

4. Some Cover can be destroyed. GM determines how much S.D.C. or M.D.C. the Cover has. PCs with backgrounds in crafting, weaponry, and the like have a solid chance of knowing how much damage said Cover can take or if the structure is effectively indestructible (GM discretion).

Ranged combat will take a little longer, but I think it will be a bit more immersive as people begin to think of how to act toward the cover in question. Do they run up and engage in melee or point-blank range? Do they use some kind of arcing attack like grenades? Do they just blow apart the cover? I don't intend on using cover with every battle - just the ones that make sense.

What do you think, Gang?
 

D. Rex

Magic Eight Ball
Heya Gang! Here are some things in Broadsword I hope to get done this (busy) week:

1. Post! =)

2. Begin Silanon's character's prologue.

3. Begin D. Rex's character's prologue.

4. Introduce Cover Rating rules (or Cover 2.0 if you like the term).

5. Create a Conversation that at least briefly outlines some of Broadsword's NPCs, especially for some of our newer players. I want the NPCs to be more than just text on a page. =)

Heya Gang! @Kaerri @Sherwood @Captain Hesperus @Psychie @Silanon @D. Rex

I'd like your input concerning my introducing Cover Rating rules during ranged combat into Broadsword's Shop Talk. Why cover? I think it adds another level of immersion, fun, and tactics without going into all-out realism. I also like cover because it's handy in Real Life and it's a little more exciting than "anything I roll on a 5 or higher has a chance of hitting, especially if it can't defend itself." Military and paramilitary folks use cover all the time, so I figure, why not try it here? My earlier players might remember that I tried this out during the Beastmaster battle on the Zeki-Zentraedi Assault Scout (and I think it worked O.K. there, but this is a different idea).

So I'd like to know - what do you think of this purely optional House Rule?

Here's how Cover Rating works. Similar to Armor Rating, Cover Rating adds to the Strike total needed to hit the target (in D&D/Pathfinder - think of Cover Rating as Armor Class or Difficulty Class). The bonus from Cover Rating is added to the number 5 (since Strikes of 1-4 on a natural roll automatically do no damage). Therefore, no cover means a 5 or higher is needed to Strike, but Light Cover brings that 5 up to an 8. Medium Cover makes that 5 climb to an 11, and Heavy Cover requires a Strike total of 14 or higher just to hit the target. Indirect weapons that are lobbed (grenades, mortars, but not missiles) take a lighter penalty to Strike (Cover Ratings against them are Light Cover - Strike of 6 or higher), Medium Cover - 7, Heavy Cover - 8). The target in Cover can still defend as normal, but they suffer in Strike rolls when they fire from behind cover. Again, this isn't based on realism; it's just a mechanic I hope is fun and fair for all.

1. GM determines if the battlefield has cover and if so, what kind, how much, and where it is.

2. Players request to use cover (simply by asking). GM describes cover opportunities.

3. Cover is provided in the 4 following types:
3a. Light Cover - Strike of 8 or higher required to hit you; you have no penalty to Strike.
3b. Medium Cover - Strike of 11 or higher required to hit you; you have a -2 penalty to Strike
3c. Heavy Cover - Strike of 14 or higher required to hit you; you have a -4 penalty to Strike
3d. Total Cover - Character cannot be seen nor do they have line-of-sight on any opponents. The character can still lob a grenade blindly or the like (using those rules).

4. Some Cover can be destroyed. GM determines how much S.D.C. or M.D.C. the Cover has. PCs with backgrounds in crafting, weaponry, and the like have a solid chance of knowing how much damage said Cover can take or if the structure is effectively indestructible (GM discretion).

Ranged combat will take a little longer, but I think it will be a bit more immersive as people begin to think of how to act toward the cover in question. Do they run up and engage in melee or point-blank range? Do they use some kind of arcing attack like grenades? Do they just blow apart the cover? I don't intend on using cover with every battle - just the ones that make sense.

What do you think, Gang?
Few questions!


Can one dive for cover as a defense action, like parry or dodge? Or must one already be in cover to get the bonus?


Will being in cover effect use dodge or parry stats?


Will being in cover offer any disadvantages? And can one fire from cover unimpeded?


Can one use a delay action while aiming at cover to wait and fire at the opponent once they peek their head out?
 

Users Who Are Viewing This Thread (Users: 0, Guests: 1)

Top